a comma needed?

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gil12345

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,

On an English test, I came across the following sentence which requires me to identify whether there is an error.

"Gradually, he grew into the role of homespun sage and philosopher, much like that of the kindly old captain he played in his last film, Steamboat Round the Bend."

For the underlined part, I think the comma is unnecessary. Yet the answer says it is ok.If so, should I say that I have a book, Gone with the Wind?

Thank you.

Gil
 
Last edited:
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If there's any mistake, it's that Steamboat should be capitalized, just like the book Gone With The Wind.

    The comma is fine in both the movie and book examples.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Without a comma would be wrong for me in your examples, but my correction uses it without a comma for the book and it's fine.
     

    gil12345

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Without a comma would be wrong for me in your examples, but my correction uses it without a comma for the book and it's fine.
    In the following sentence, a comma is not used. I am confused.

    "Howe's fifty-seven-year career in cinematography began later, on the set of famed director Cecil B.DeMille's 1919 film Male and Female. "

    What is the difference between those examples?
    How come one uses a comma and another not?

    Help me out, please.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Here's a simpler example:

    My brother David came over this afternoon.
    One of my brothers, David, came over this afternoon.


    Sorry, I'm rushing out right now, but I'm sure someone else can elaborate. :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "... his last film" identifies exactly one film. The name of the film is added as an appositive - it's just extra information.
    "... famed director Cecil B.DeMille's 1919 film" is not a particular film (in fact, he produced three films in 1919 but it's only necessary to know that films are not a yearly occurance). The name of the film is necessary information to complete the noun phrase. It's not an appositive.
     

    gil12345

    Senior Member
    chinese
    "... his last film" identifies exactly one film. The name of the film is added as an appositive - it's just extra information.
    "... famed director Cecil B.DeMille's 1919 film" is not a particular film (in fact, he produced three films in 1919 but it's only necessary to know that films are not a yearly occurance). The name of the film is necessary information to complete the noun phrase. It's not an appositive.
    Thank you.
     
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