a concourse of people

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hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
"The exquisite pleasure of mixing freely with such a concourse of people, who are for the most part well dressed and and handsome, I have experienced this evening for the first time."

What is the difference between "a concourse of people" and "a crown of people" for the above? It is about a traveler and his walking journey. I read it but I didn't understand well enough. I think he was walking and somebody were joining his walk.

Wanderlust by Rebecca Solnit.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Citing the original source may be helpful. (Solnit is quoting from another work here, one that was written more than 200 years ago.)

    The original source is Travels in England in 1782, by the German writer Karl Philipp Moritz.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The use is archaic (my thanks to Florentina for the actual source of the quote) - concourse in this sense, is rarely if ever used today. It does mean "crowd".
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Citing the original source may be helpful. (Solnit is quoting from another work here, one that was written more than 200 years ago.)

    The original source is Travels in England in 1782, by the German writer Karl Philipp Moritz.
    It seems most of the sources including "a concourse of people" are very old. Some new one quoted them.
     
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