a conscientious expression

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Tea Addict

Senior Member
Republic of Korea Korean
Hello everyone. I would like to know what "a conscientious expression" in the following sentences:

The other girl, Daisy, made an attempt to rise — she leaned slightly forward with a conscientious expression — then she laughed, an absurd, charming little laugh, and I laughed too and came forward into the room.
“I’m p-paralyzed with happiness.” She laughed again, as if she said something very witty, and held my hand for a moment, looking up into my face, promising that there was no one in the world she so much wanted to see. That was a way she had.

- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Chapter 1

The narrator Nick first moved into the East, and visited his remote relative Daisy's house in the neighborhood to have dinner together. When Nick came in, Daisy began to stand up from the couch and then laughed.

In this context, I could not understand what "conscientious" meant. Does it mean that Daisy recognized Nick's face? Or that she was wearing a very serious face?

I would very much appreciate your help. :)
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It isn't a common term so I cannot quite tell what expression she had on her face, but it seems her conscience was prompting her to stand up at Nick's appearance, and she had got as far as positioning her body ready to stand, and putting an appropriate expression on her face (whatever that might be). Standing up is a sign of respect, of course, and used to be very common when someone entered a room.
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear Uncle Jack,

    Thank you so much for the explanation.
    It indeed is very hard to grasp what expression she wore exactly.
    Then, since it was shown when Nick entered the room, can I interpret it as a polite, recognizing expression?
     
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