a cooked person [a fully cooked human being]

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quaerereverum

Senior Member
Persian
Hallo,
I read in the book written by Judge Juddy, ''a cooked person'' which was referred to an experienced person, but I'm not sure whether it is common in English. What should I say, if a person has knowledge and experience.

Thank you for your response.
 
  • quaerereverum

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I know sound strange, but I read it in ''Beauty Fades, Dumb is Forever: The Making of a Happy Woman''. Right now I don't have a book , but I remember when I showed my teacher, he said it is not used in English and he related it to the religion of Judge Juddy. In East, we say so, when a person has experience. he is a cooked person. Hope it helps.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Her name is Judy, not Juddy ... and the line is: When I started in the television business, I was already a fully cooked human being. (Source)

    She's comparing herself to a dish you would serve -- it's fully cooked, ready to serve right now. She explains that by the time she came to television, she'd been a lawyer, then a judge, and then she ran the courts of Manhattan, so she was a woman in her 50s with a lot of experience in life. She wasn't a young, innocent girl.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...but I remember when I showed my teacher, he said it is not used in English and he related it to the religion of Judge Juddy...
    I found the context. The full sentence, on page 90 of the book, is "When I started in the television business, I was already a fully cooked human being." (By the way, I don't have a copy of the book either. I found it on the Web, in Google Books. You could have found it there too.)

    She is referring to the fact that she was already an experienced adult when her TV show began. The point she makes later on that page is that, while the Hollywood people she worked with in creating the show thought they knew everything about television, the fact was that she knew a lot also.

    This is not a standard expression in English. It is just her way of expressing herself.

    My religion is the same as Judge Judy's. I do not see any possible connection between it and this expression.

    By the way, there is only one "d" in "Judy." It is a common short form of her full given name, "Judith."
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    As a regular viewer of Judge Judy, I have heard her use this expression many, many times, referring to teenagers who are not mature (as often evidenced in their actions, which have brought them to court as defendants.)

    I have not heard this expression used by anyone else, nor read it other than in one of her books. I wouldn't use it.
     

    quaerereverum

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thank you so much Copyright, Egmont,Milkybarkid for explanation. As I said in the East, we use this expression, to say somebody has experience.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In the West, we only use the opposite: "He knew nothing about the army; he was a raw recruit."
     

    quaerereverum

    Senior Member
    Persian
    But we have the same expression either.I just shamed to write. I thought people would laugh at me. Thank you PaulQ for more explanation.
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    Hah! The minute I read "cooked person", I said to myself, "Judge Judy!"

    I wonder if your teacher's reference to Judge Judy's religion might be a guess that "cooked person" could be the translation of an expression in Yiddish. Judge Judy often sprinkles her speech with translated, or untranslated, Yiddish. Sometimes she translates for our benefit ("bubba meise" means "grandma's story"), sometimes she doesn't bother.
     

    quaerereverum

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I don't think it is related to religion, rather it relates to expressions , traditions which are common in the East. If you read her book, you notice that the way she has taken care of her family and her relationship with her parents, are things that we see more often in the East. It is just my opinion.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't think it is related to religion, rather it relates to expressions , traditions which are common in the East. If you read her book, you notice that the way she has taken care of her family and her relationship with her parents, are things that we see more often in the East. It is just my opinion.
    That may be so, but in that case, what would it have to do with her religion (see post #3)? The sources I checked say she's Jewish - not Shinto, Tao, Buddhist, etc.
     

    quaerereverum

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Dear Sir,

    When I read her book, I asked my English teacher, because I was enjoyed seeing the expression ''cooked'' since we have the same expression. I showed him the book and he told me perhaps because of her religion. I'm a big fun of Judge Judy, and I follow her program. I don't care about religion. Sir, we inherit it like other things such as nationality. I hope it helps.

    Sincerely,
     

    Tracer

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's not very common but at least in American English, we have the idiom: "I'm cooked"......meaning, I'm finished, I'm in trouble, I can't escape (my situation) etc.

    Meaning almost the same thing, we have the expression: "My goose is cooked"....meaning "I'm in trouble" etc.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    For me, seeing the context it means not raw. A cooked and experienced expert rather than a raw beginner. The writer is playing with the expression cooked contrasting it with raw normally meaning uncooked but with beginners or recruits it means inexperienced. "I'm cooked" is used in BE in the same way as for Tracer but I don't think it has anything to do with it. Swift in A modest Proposal talks about how delicious the meat of a freshly cooked infant is. This obviously has no relation.
     
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