a country that many associate with food safety scandals

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LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
The ban, to be formally announced on Monday, is likely to propel consumer worries about organic food from a country that many associate with food safety scandals and lax regulation, involving things like contaminated milk and toys coated in lead paint. ---taken from the NYT

Dear all,

I read that clause as a relatvie clause modifying a country, but I am wondering whether where should be used to replace that. May I have your opinions? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No, the country itself is associated with scandals (by people outside the country). Changing it to "a country where..." or "a country in which..." would mean that many people inside the country associate it with scandals.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    No, the country itself is associated with scandals (by people outside the country). Changing it to "a country where..." or "a country in which..." would mean that many people inside the country associate it with scandals.
    I've got it. Thank you.:)
     

    Piers

    Member
    Am. English
    You might say:
    a country where there are food safety scandals and lax regulation ...
    a country where [the government] is associated with safety scandals ...

    Only changing "that" to "where" doesn't leave the phrase exactly right:
    ... a country where many associate [what?] with food safety scandals ...

    Correct:
    ... a country where many associate [the government] with food safety scandals

    Still, this means people in the country associate their government with scandals. It says nothing about people elsewhere that could also associate that country with scandals, as Myridon says. :)
     
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