a credit

polybolos

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, everyone.
I have a question concerning the following sentence, please help.

Once in a while a ball is given to which the hostess invites every person on her visiting list.
Mrs. Titherington de Puyster give one every season, which although a credit to their intentions is seldom a credit to their sense of beauty!

--quoted form chapter 7 at 17. Balls and Dances. Post, Emily. 1922. Etiquette

Question
I was taught by some dictionaries that a credit means good person, but in this sentence above, I assume both of a credit in bold would means another . But it's difficult to guess it. Give me suggestions please.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Mrs. Titherington de Puyster give one every season,
    The sentence starts "Mr. and Mrs. Titherington De Puyster..."

    which although a credit to their intentions
    It speaks well of their intentions. It shows they are hospitable, social people who make the effort to maintain contact with their friends.

    is seldom a credit to their sense of beauty!
    This is explained in the words that follow. "...a brilliant ball is necessarily a collection of brilliantly fashionable people, and the hostess who gathers in all the oddly assorted frumps on the outskirts of society cannot expect to achieve a very distinguished result."

    Those words mean that since everyone on their visiting list is invited, it's likely that there will be guests who don't fit in. The sentence implies that the host and hostess need to pick and choose their guests to make sure they have people who are or look good/fashionable/distinguished, so that the ball is a success.
     
    Last edited:

    polybolos

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for minute answering, Barque!

    Thanks to your profound and kindly answering, I understood not only the meaning of a credit but the sentences as well, thank you so much!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top