A curious little vignette that I am inclined to think caught Filmer

hlkbll

Member
Turkish
A curious little vignette that I am inclined to think caught Filmer in or near the very birth of his discovery.


I am not sure here as to how to break down this sentence.

I am inclined to think that a curious little vignette caught Filmer...

(There is--This is) a curious little vignette that I am inclined to think caught Filmer...

Which one of these, or any other, sentences best explain the above sentence?

Here is the rest of the paragraph taken from the short story titled Filmer:

A curious little vignette that I am inclined to think caught Filmer in or near the very birth of his discovery. Hicks was wrong in anticipating a provincial professorship for Filmer. Our next glimpse of him is lecturing on “rubber and rubber substitutes,” to the Society of Arts—he had become manager to a great plastic-substance manufactory—and at that time, it is now known, he was a member of the Aeronautical Society, albeit he contributed nothing to the discussions of that body, preferring no doubt to mature his great conception without external assistance. And within two years of that paper before the Society of Arts he was hastily taking out a number of patents and proclaiming in various undignified ways the completion of the divergent inquiries which made his flying machine possible. < ---- >

Edited to reduce quotation to 4 sentences in compliance with Rule 4. Cagey, moderator
 
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  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It isn't a sentence, but a noun phrase serving as a title, a description or an introduction. You might read it as a sentence with "This is" omitted from the beginning, as you have done in your second option.
     
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