a dark guy

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DeeDol

Senior Member
Slovak
Hi, this is from Galbraith's Career of Evil. One of the characters from Barrow-in-Furness is decribed as a "Big dark guy, cauliflower ear..."

Is it possible to know whether Galbraith/Rowling means dark = dark-haired, maybe dark-eyed, OR (also) dark = dark-skinned?

I found further descriptions of this character and his twin sister:

<----Quote has been edited by moderator (Florentia52) to comply with four-sentence maximum.----->"A dark crew cut, a long, narrow face, tinged blue around the jaw and with an unusually high forehead: Strike had thought when they had first met that his elongated head and slightly lopsided features made it look as though Brockbank’s head had been squeezed in a vice."

"She had the same long face and high forehead as Brockbank; her flinty eyes were outlined in thick kohl, her jet-black hair scraped back into a tight, unflattering ponytail. The cap-sleeved black T-shirt, worn under a white apron, revealed thick bare arms that were covered in tattoos from shoulder to wrist. Multiple gold hoops hung from each ear. A vertical frown line between her eyebrows gave her a look of perpetual bad temper."

Thank you.

I hope I can use as many quotations if they are from different chapters in the book. If not, I'll try to delete some.
 
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  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo DeeDol. His twin sister sounds like (the British stereotype of) a Gypsy* ~ are these people Gypsies?

    *Or pirate:D
     

    DeeDol

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Hi ewie,
    I don't know and I can't find anything in the book that would help me.
    (And I have to translate it and there is a difference between "dark" and "dark" in my country...)
    I just know that he was in the army and they are both poor. Galbraith/Rowling is quite realistic, so it might help to know if there are any/many Gypsies and/or dark-skinned people in Barrow-in-Furness. I have no idea about the size of the place but I guess in terms of population, it's not as multicultural as London or Brighton. Am I wrong?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Barrow is a fairly small place by British standards, kind of in the middle of nowhere, (formerly) renowned for shipbuilding. I've only been a couple of times but can't imagine it's ever been very multicultural*.
    Unfortunately dark tends to be somewhat vague in English: the chap merely sounds dark-haired, his sister sounds like she might be dark-skinned or swarthy ~ it's impossible to say what the author intended:(

    *According to the Wikipedia article linked to above, the population is 97% 'white British'.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Sorry I couldn't give a definitive answer. Knowing more about who these people are might help ... but I'm not about to start reading J K Rowling:eek::p
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Noel Campbell Brockbank doesn't sound like a Roma name. ;) "tinged blue around the jaw" suggests to someone with very pale skin that the whiskers under the skin should produce a blue-ish appearance. Black whiskers under dark skin would not look blue. The sister sounds more goth than gypsy to me.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    "tinged blue around the jaw" suggests to someone with very pale skin that the whiskers under the skin should produce a blue-ish appearance. Black whiskers under dark skin would not look blue.
    :thumbsup:Exactly the same thing occurred to me about 20 seconds after I switched my computer off last night, which was the time Myridon was posting this. I used to know a (white) chap who had very very dark hair and very very pale skin: his chin was permanently blue. (I asked him once why he never grew a beard: "Because they make me look like a werewolf," was the reply:cool:)
     
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