a day that will live in infamy

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
infamy
a day that will live in infamy
oxforddictionaries

One day someone did something disgraceful. Since then everyone has remembered about that and will remember for a long time. -- Do I correctly understand the example?
Thanks.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    You understand the general meaning. However, this was said immediately after the event. (It refers to the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii, on December 7, 1941, and was said by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a radio speech to the American people.) He could not know then that everyone would remember that day for a long time after. He thought they would, though. This is his thought, his prediction.

    Cross-posted.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    infamy
    a day that will live in infamy
    oxforddictionaries

    One day someone did something disgraceful. Since then everyone has remembered about that and will remember for a long time. and the speaker thinks that it will be remembered for ever.
    The phrase is used subjectively, where the speaker thinks something is outrageous,and can be used of days or events that have happened or that will happen, both using the future tense:

    "On 30 January 1649, Oliver Cromwell had the rightful King of England beheaded, a day/deed that will live in infamy."
    "If they ever make England use the Euro, it will be a day/deed that will live in infamy."

    "On December 22nd, 1657, Oliver Cromwell banned the eating of mince pies at Christmas[1], a day/deed that will live in infamy."

    [1] this is true but very few people have ever heard of it.
     
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