a decade that owes partly to a strength U.S. President ....who would like

DUET

Senior Member
Bengali
Source


Japan’s longest growth streak in more than a decade owes partly to a strength U.S. President Donald Trump would like to emulate: a robust manufacturing base that is shipping to overseas markets such as China.

What about the following modification?

Japan’s longest growth streak in more than a decade that owes partly to a strength U.S. President Donald Trump who would like to emulate: a robust manufacturing base that is shipping to overseas markets such as China.
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    No, that doesn't make good grammar in standard English.

    I think the original sentence is not written well. Here's my version.

    Japan’s longest growth streak in more than a decade is owed partly to a strength U.S. President Donald Trump would like to emulate: a robust manufacturing base that is shipping to overseas markets such as China.


    Does that help?

    You don't want "who" there. Donald Trump would like (wants) to do something. No who.

    Example:
    I want to emulate my brother's success. :tick:
    I who want to emulate my brother's success.:cross:
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Japan’s longest growth streak in more than a decade owes partly to a strength U.S. President Donald Trump would like to emulate: a robust manufacturing base that is shipping to overseas markets such as China.
    'Owes' is incorrect and, as Kentix says, ought to be 'is owed'. Apart from that, there is no mistake.

    'Strength' is a noun and not an adjective. The sentence would be clearer if we put 'that' or 'which' after it: 'a strength which U.S. President Donald Trump would like to emulate'.
     
    Last edited:
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