a definition of "is" within the verb "be"

lkjhg811

Senior Member
Korean
B: Is "is circa 1600" understood to mean "is from circa 1600"?.
A: Yes, or "is" can be taken to mean "dates from".
B: Does the verb "be" have a meaning of "to date from"? The meaning "to date from" isn't entered at any entry for the verb "be" in all my dictionaries.
A: I meant that it can be taken to mean the same as "dates from". I didn't say that "dates from" is a definition of "is" within the verb "be".
(Reference: is c. 1600 )

1. "dates from" is "is"'s definition within the verb "be".
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I'd like to know if the red part has the same meaning as sentence 1
 
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  • icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    Sentence 1 here does not make sense. You could instead say:
    2. I didn't say that 'dates from' is a definition of the verb 'be' [that you could find in any dictionary].
     

    icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    I'd also like to know if "is" is within the verb "be".
    I'm not sure I understand your question. 'Is' is a form of 'be', inflected to agree with a singular subject in the present tense, so in a way it is 'within' the verb; but more correctly it just is the verb 'be', but with a different (surface) form.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    I'd also like to know if "is" is within the verb "be".
    I don't know this meaning of "within". How can one word be "inside" another word?
    Does the verb "be" have a meaning of "to date from"? The meaning "to date from" isn't entered at any entry for the verb "be" in all my dictionaries.
    No. But the word "circa" has that meaning. "Circa" means "approximately" and is used before a year.

    So "circa 1600" means "approximately the year 1600".

    is from circa 1600
    That depends on what "from" means here. Sometimes "from 1600" means "starting at 1600".

    "Circa 1600" means "at approximately 1600", not "starting at approximately 1600".
     

    lkjhg811

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I don't know this meaning of "within". How can one word be "inside" another word?
    "dates from" is a definition of "is" within the verb "be"

    I'm having trouble understanding the blue part.
    I'd like to know if the blue part means "a definition of "is" within definitions of the verb "be".
    What exactly does the blue part mean?
     

    icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    "dates from" is a definition of "is" within the verb "be"

    I'm having trouble understanding the blue part.
    I'd like to know if the blue part means "a definition of "is" within definitions of the verb "be".
    Yes, this is what it means, but 'within' is not a usual way of expressing this idea.
    See my suggestion in post #2 for a more natural way of saying this.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The source for this sentence was 'The noun meaning "accent mark over a vowel" is c. 1600, from French.'

    That is badly expressed. It could have been better phrased as: 'The noun meaning "accent mark over a vowel" is first seen c. 1600. It comes from French'.
     
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