A difference of only 2 percentage points <between/in> the unemployment rates ...

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Roundhouse

Senior Member
Bengali
I have two regions: A and B.

The regional unemployment rate in A is 10% and in B is 12%.

Is the following sentence technically wrong?

A difference of only 2 percentage points in the unemployment rates ...
Should it instead be this:

A difference of only 2 percentage points between the unemployment rates ...
When we talk about a change in the unemployment rate in a specific region, then "in" is used (e.g., a 5% decline in the unemployment rate in BC). But given the comparison is between two regions I am wondering if using "in" is wrong.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    You can use both "in" and "between" in this sentence.

    "A/The difference in the two" = "A/The difference between the two".
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It would help a great deal if you wrote out the sentence in full, as well as any previous sentences that are needed to understand the situation. As it stands, it is not at all clear that your "between" expression makes it clear what the difference is actually between.
     

    Roundhouse

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    It would help a great deal if you wrote out the sentence in full, as well as any previous sentences that are needed to understand the situation. As it stands, it is not at all clear that your "between" expression makes it clear what the difference is actually between.

    Uncle Jack, here they are:

    Despite having identical work histories, John does not qualify for EI benefits in region A, whereas Jade qualifies for 20 weeks of EI benefits in region B. The two workers are treated very differently because of a difference of only 2 percentage points between the regional unemployment rates.
     
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