a different level than what is selected

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Lyberty

Senior Member
Hebrew/Russian
Hello,

I have a sentence "The schema was created for other hierarchy level than what is selected now." I wnat to do something about this, but not sure what.

Can I use "than" with "other"? Or would you prefer "a different heirarchy level" here?
And, if "a different" is better, can I use "than" with an adjective "different"? Or should it be "from"?

Thanks a lot, Liz
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Different than" in American speech, just like "different to" in British use, always sets my teeth on edge. You can avoid producing this reaction in your readers or hearers by using the indisputably correct combination "different from". You might say:

    The schema was created for a hierarchy level different from the one selected now.
     

    envie de voyager

    Senior Member
    english-canadian
    "Different than" in American speech, just like "different to" in British use, always sets my teeth on edge. You can avoid producing this reaction in your readers or hearers by using the indisputably correct combination "different from". You might say:

    The schema was created for a hierarchy level different from the one selected now.
    Odd. I've never come across this rule before. Thank you for educating me.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Odd. I've never come across this rule before. Thank you for educating me.
    What rule? That the word which follows "different" should be "from", and not "than"? It would be odd if you never came across it before. What will drive it home is to hear someone from the UK say "this is different to that"; most UK speakers would find "than" in that position as odd as North Americans would find "to", but few in either country would find "different from each other" unfamiliar.
     
    Last edited:

    JaimeSommers

    New Member
    Italian
    Hello,

    I wonder: do you think the following

    "The schema was created for a hierarchy level other than the one now selected"

    would be correct as well? And - if so - how does it sound to a native (BE/AE) speaker? A little formal, maybe?

    Thank you.
     

    envie de voyager

    Senior Member
    english-canadian
    What rule? That the word which follows "different" should be "from", and not "than"? It would be odd if you never came across it before. What will drive it home is to hear someone from the UK say "this is different to that"; most UK speakers would find "than" in that position as odd as North Americans would find "to", but few in eithe rcountry would find "different from each other" unfmailiar.
    I see. This isn't a rule, just a personal preference.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I see. This isn't a rule, just a personal preference.
    What "rule" are you speaking of? If you mean "the word to place after 'different' should be 'from'" -- then yes, you can use that as a rule. It is often misleading, though, to speak of "rules" in English, as if there were someone with the authority to make and enforce real regulations for the language.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Statistics would seem to be on GWB's side. In speech, from outnumbers than by more than 2:1 in the US, while (or whilst) from outnumbers to by the same margin in the UK. However, in written, from outnumbers either to or than by >9:1 in both locations.
    (Statistical spource not verified personally :D )
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Hi, Lyberty.

    (And welcome to the forum, Jaime Sommers.)

    The singular count noun hierarchy requires a determiner, and in this case the indefinite article fits best: "a hierarchy level" or "another hierarchy level" (another = an + other): The schema was created for another hierarchy level than what is selected now.

    If you don't like than after another, you can move other to after the noun: The schema was created for a hierarchy level other than what is selected now.

    Another alternative in this case is to use the plural and omit the article: The schema was created for other hierarchy levels than the one(s) selected now.

    If you feel than different is more meaningful here than other, you can say: The schema was created for a different hierarchy level from what is selected now. The article is still required, but it does not make a compound word with different.

    Than is a versatile word than allows us to take certain liberties with what follows, including the omission of the relative pronoun (because than itself was originally a form of that) and even the omission of the verb is. Any of the following can be used instead of "than what is selected now":

    than that selected now.
    than what is now selected.
    than is now selected.
    than now selected.

    "Different than" is not yet accepted everywhere, but here in America it has a special purpose. In American English, "than is now selected" and "than now selected" can be used after different, as they can after other, to simplify the sentence. In formal English, even in America, "different than" is not generally accepted except where it allows these simplified constructions that are impossible after from:

    The schema was created for a different hierarchy level than (is) now selected. :tick: [simplified relative clause impossible with from.]
    The schema was created for a different hierarchy level than what is selected now. :cross: [should be from what ....]
     
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    Lyberty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew/Russian
    Thank you for your help, everybody.

    I think I'll go with this one:
    The schema was created for a different hierarchy level than is now selected.

    It's a system message, so the shorther the better.

    Liz
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    If you are looking for something short, how about:

    Hierarchy level selected does not match schema.
    or Hierarchy level mismatch.

    This is "telegraphic language", used when space comes at a premium, originally invented for use in telegraphs and newspaper headlines. Note that articles are omitted if the meaning is clear.
     
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