A dish that is commonly served to guests

Shiratori99

Senior Member
German - Germany
Title, now included in this post:
A dish that is commonly served to guests

Hello,

referring to the title, how would you call this kind of dish in English?

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I really don't know what you mean, Shiratori99. Could you explain in more detail what you mean?

    I could give you several different answers depending on context.
     

    Shiratori99

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Do you mean in a restaurant, or more at home?
    At home, when you have guests over.

    I really don't know what you mean, Shiratori99. Could you explain in more detail what you mean?

    I could give you several different answers depending on context.
    Well, what I mean is a dish that is especially known for serving it to guests in one's own house.

    edit: I'm translating something from another language, so maybe this concept just doesn't exist in English speaking countries? What would be a suitable approximation then?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    If XXX is a last name, you could say something like "this is a XXX-specialty".

    Or "this is our favorite dish around here".

    Or "this is our go-to dish around here".

    I also am still not entirely sure what's meant, ST99.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I don't think this is really a language question. To be sure, I need to see an example sentence that would refer to this dish.

    For example, in my part of the world we might refer to a "traditional Irish breakfast". But that, obviously, is an expression that is only relevant in relation to breakfast.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I think I get the question, and the answer that comes to mind is pretty old-fashioned: "a company dish." That's what my mother would have called a special, fairly elaborate dish that she would never dream of making for an ordinary family dinner, but would make if we were having "company" over for a dinner party.

    It's a term I haven't heard for years, though.
     

    Winstanley808

    Banned
    English - U.S.
    Shiratory, can you take this to a German-English forum?

    NB: Note that the "company" in artichoke's post refers to household guests, not a corporation or business organization.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Well, what I mean is a dish that is especially known for serving it to guests in one's own house.

    edit: I'm translating something from another language, so maybe this concept just doesn't exist in English speaking countries? What would be a suitable approximation then?
    I don't think you can generalise about all English-speaking countries, but it's certainly a concept that doesn't exist in our house (nor indeed in several others I know). There are many dishes that are 'a bit special' that we do when we have company, but they're so good that we don't deprive ourselves by keeping them only for when we have people round.

    I'm also a bit puzzled by your "especially known for serving it to guests". That sounds as though certain dishes are widely (nationally?) recognised as being in that category. While I can see that a particular family might have certain dishes with that status, I find it hard to imagine a set of such dishes being a constant across a whole country.


    But as Panj said, an example in a sentence might help us to suggest an appropriate word or phrase in English.

    By the way, sorry to say, Arti, but I've never heard of a "company dish". I'd probably understand it, as Winstanley mentioned, to be something with a corporate connection!;)

    Ws
     

    Shiratori99

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Thanks everyone for your replies!

    Shiratory, can you take this to a German-English forum?

    NB: Note that the "company" in artichoke's post refers to household guests, not a corporation or business organization.
    Well, it's not from German, but from Japanese. I think this is something that native English speakers can answer better though.

    I don't think you can generalise about all English-speaking countries, but it's certainly a concept that doesn't exist in our house (nor indeed in several others I know). There are many dishes that are 'a bit special' that we do when we have company, but they're so good that we don't deprive ourselves by keeping them only for when we have people round.

    I'm also a bit puzzled by your "especially known for serving it to guests". That sounds as though certain dishes are widely (nationally?) recognised as being in that category. While I can see that a particular family might have certain dishes with that status, I find it hard to imagine a set of such dishes being a constant across a whole country.
    Well it's not that you would never eat it by yourselves, but it's certainly a kind of dish that you'd usually enjoy in company with others, particularly to treat guests. I guess the "in company with others" is the most important part actually. It's not a festive dish though :s

    But as Panj said, an example in a sentence might help us to suggest an appropriate word or phrase in English.
    Wanko soba is the local ( ) dish of the Japanese prefecture of Iwate.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I guess you could pull off "featured"---I'd probably use "locally" though.

    Wanko soba is the locally featured dish ....

    Just a brainstorm.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The Wikipedia entry says only that wanko soba is just buckwheat noodles in a small bowl and it's the small bowl for visitors that's traditional in a small area of Japan. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanko_soba

    As others have said we don't have a traditional "guest dish," (my invented word - don't use it) in the English-speaking world, so it's not surprising that we cannot come up with a word for it.o_O
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    Perhaps, a regional dish often served to/to invite/welcome guests? The problem, is that this custom is not common in the English-speaking world. As no translation really exists, one must explain it. You have the possibility of the footnote, asterisk, or parenthesis.

    For example, Texas is known for barbecue, but it is not a dish I would ever serve my guests. The buckwheat soba you described is akin to the region and a common dish that would be served to guests, but that doesn't necessarily transfer over to Anglophone culture.
     

    Shiratori99

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Perhaps, a regional dish often served to/to invite/welcome guests? The problem, is that this custom is not common in the English-speaking world. As no translation really exists, one must explain it. You have the possibility of the footnote, asterisk, or parenthesis.

    For example, Texas is known for barbecue, but it is not a dish I would ever serve my guests. The buckwheat soba you described is akin to the region and a common dish that would be served to guests, but that doesn't necessarily transfer over to Anglophone culture.
    Yeah, I guess we can leave it at that then. Thanks for your help, everyone :p
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Ah - so we are talking about something like a regional specialty or regional dish.
    There are plenty of these around here. They aren't always the kind of thing I would now serve to my guests, but they are dishes considered typical of the region. So you would have Irish stew, Lancashire hotpot, ... and various other specialties that if I posted their names I'd start an avalanche of off-topicness.
    But often these are served to tourists as typical of the food of the region.
     

    Yul

    Senior Member
    Canada, French
    I think Keith got it right with his "signature dish".

    I like it.

    I like to use (correctly?) "my trademark dish".

    Yul
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I sort of agree with panjandrum. As much as it is sort of a trademark/signature dish in a way, it doesn't seem to quite fit Shiratori's context.

    In the meantime, I want to say: Wanko soba is a dish commonly served in restaurants in the Iwate prefecture. :confused:
     

    ayuda?

    Senior Member
    I think you could just simply say “a very common dish, “ or “a very popular dish.”

    The meaning there would be that a lot of people eat that particular food (i.e., in a place where a lot of rice is grown, rice with some other ingredients might be a common dish—and not necessarily a traditional one, like paella is in Spain ).
    Traditional might be better in the larger, cultural sense in the example about Spain.

    In any case, I feel like a “very common/popular dish” could cover both situations unless, of course, you really needed to make the distinction clearer.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)

    Shiratori99

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    But Shiratori, you said earlier ...
    ... and that's what we've all been racking our brains over.


    Ws
    Okay sorry about the confusion lol. It's being served both in restaurants and at home. I wrote that it's a dish commonly served to guests.
     
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