a dish/ tray of shrimps

Morecoffee

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,teachers.
I looked up the dictionary, but still couldn't tell the difference between dish and tray.
Is it interchangeable in my attempt, a dish/ tray of shrimps.
By the way, is shrimp countable in this context?
a dish of shrimp or shrimps?
Thank you
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Both "tray" and "dish" would be possible, so the question is what you mean. Could you give us some context?

    "Shrimp" is uncountable in this context.
     

    Morecoffee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello, The Newt.
    I wrote this noun phrase myself.
    I'd cooked shrimp for Jim. I put it on the tray/dish,then I gave it to Jim. When Jim dropped a shrimp while he was eating the shrimp.
    So in this context, which one is possible? Tray or dish?
    In the second part of my sentence, is "a shrimp" correct in this context?
    Thank you so much
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hello, The Newt.
    I wrote this noun phrase myself.
    I'd cooked shrimp for Jim. I put it on the tray/dish,then I gave it to Jim. When Jim dropped a shrimp while he was eating the shrimp.
    So in this context, which one is possible? Tray or dish?
    In the second part of my sentence, is "a shrimp" correct in this context?
    Thank you so much
    "A shrimp" is fine (see my response to Glenfarcas). A tray would be a flat platter you might set out on a table at a party for twenty people; a dish would be a smaller piece of china (or whatever material), often suitable for an individual diner.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I should add that strictly speaking "shrimp" is normally countable — but the plural form is identical to the singular. One shrimp, two shrimp, three shrimp are on the plate.
    Good point -- in American English, it's countable but the plural looks like the singular. In British English, it's countable and the plural takes -s: ten shrimps.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    RE your actual question about tray / dish. Assuming you are talking about crockery / china that you eat your food from ...

    If you have served someone a meal (of any fish or meat etc) you do not usually serve it on a tray. In the UK -- trays of food maybe laid out at a buffet but you take your own portion and put is on a PLATE. Or you can put other crockery on a bigger tray to take your food from a servery to your table, but that is not made of china itself.
    Dishes in the UK are mainly used for moist food like soup, custard etc.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    My - admittedly limited - experience is that where AmE-speakers serve/eat shrimp, I serve/eat prawns.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    My - admittedly limited - experience is that where AmE-speakers serve/eat shrimp, I serve/eat prawns.
    That's partly what I meant.:) Shrimp are smaller than prawns**, but I noticed that they're all 'shrimp' in the States (California and Florida, at least: I have never eaten them on the East Coast or in the Mid West, so I wouldn't know what they say there) . Mostly served on large plates (or in wax-paper cones or boxes, of course).

    ** I know I am generalising, but there are so many varieties of these creatures around the world, all with different scientific and local names.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    That's partly what I meant.:) Shrimp are smaller than prawns**, but I noticed that they're all 'shrimp' in the States (California and Florida, at least: I have never eaten them on the East Coast or in the Mid West, so I wouldn't know what they say there) . Mostly served on large plates (or in wax-paper cones or boxes, of course).

    ** I know I am generalising, but there are so many varieties of these creatures around the world, all with different scientific and local names.
    Some of the discussion is here "shrimp prawn"
     
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