a district where the Conservative Party can't elect in the write-in [riding] I'm in

jasminasul

Senior Member
Spanish Andalusia
Esta es una frase de una entrevista:

I'm living in Toronto now, although I lived in the US for quite a few years. But we had an election here recently, and I happen to be in a district where the Conservative Party can't elect in the write-in I'm in. But there's a competition between a Green Party candidate, an NDP candidate, a Liberal Party, who all claimed to have a concern about climate.

Quizá si intento traducir write-in me va a quedar una frase muy farragosa y no tiene nada que ver con el tema, que es el cambio climático:
el partido conservador no puede ganar en el distrito en el que yo estoy inscrito
 
  • Galván

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    "... estoy en un distrito donde el partido conservador no puede elegir de la agrupación de inscritos al cual pertenezco".

    En las papeletas de votación aparencen espacios en blanco donde puedes anotar (de tu puño y letra) al candidato de tu preferencia si este no aparece en la lista de candidatos que te ofrece la papeleta.
     
    Last edited:

    Downbow

    Senior Member
    English - USA/Canada
    I'm living in Montréal now, although I lived in the US for quite a few years.

    I can't make any sense of the passage. Perhaps it has been mistranscribed? It seems to mean "The Conservatives never win in my district, but there is competition between the Greens, the NDP and the Liberals [three parties on the left] ?so votes could be divided to the point where the Conservatives win." I have worked on interviews that were transcribed by voice recognition software, and although amazing things can be done these days, silly mistakes do occur.
     

    jasminasul

    Senior Member
    Spanish Andalusia
    This is what he says. It's not elegant English, but it's correctly transcribed.
    My issue was with the use of elect here, but in another interview he said that if faced with the risk of having a climate science denier in office, he would pinch his nose and vote for whatever candidate was in a position to beat him or her. So here I think he's saying that, since the Republican Party cannot win in his district, he is able to choose the candidate with the best climate platform.
    I think that Downbow has understood the gist of it. Thank you both.
     

    jasminasul

    Senior Member
    Spanish Andalusia
    Apologies, I've just realised it's riding, I will amend the title. So it seems to mean jurisdicción:

    The word riding is descended from late Old English þriðing or *þriding (recorded only in Latin contexts or forms, e.g., trehing, treding, trithing, with Latin initial t here representing the Old English letter thorn). It came into Old English as a loanword from Old Norse þriðjungr, meaning a third part (especially of a county) – the original "ridings", in the English counties of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, were in each case a set of three, though once the term was adopted elsewhere it was used for other numbers (compare to farthings). The modern form riding was the result of the initial th being absorbed in the final th or t of the words north, south, east and west, by which it was normally preceded.[2][3][4]

    A common misconception holds that the term arose from some association between the size of the district and the distance that can be covered or encircled on horseback in a certain amount of time (compare the Walking Purchase).
     

    Downbow

    Senior Member
    English - USA/Canada
    Masood's
    a district where the Conservative Party can't elect in the region I'm in..
    led me to a theory that I think is very strong theory: "write-in" is a mistake for "riding" (In Canada, a riding is "a political division represented by a Member of Parliament" (Gage Dictionary).
    This would make jasminasul's
    since the Republican Party cannot win in his district, he is able to choose the candidate with the best climate platform.
    almost certainly the correct interpretation.
    Donald
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    ...Led me to a theory that I think is very strong theory: "write-in" is a mistake for "riding" (In Canada, a riding is "a political division represented by a Member of Parliament" (Gage Dictionary).
    Same use over here. A riding is an administrative region (of Yorkshire, for example).
     
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