A doctor is caring for the bearded man who fell down on the ground (being) unconscious.

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Lia1234

Member
Korean
Hi!

A doctor is caring for the bearded man (who fell down on the ground unconscious.)

In this sentence, the bearded man was unconscious, right? So could I add ',' and being' like this:
A doctor is caring for the bearded man who fell down on the ground, being unconscious.
Is this correct as well?

Thank you.
 
  • Yes, the context makes clear it's the man who fell.
    No, you should not add 'being'. Further, that makes it seem he's unconscious first, then falls.

    Sometimes 'being' might work. The doctor was caring for the man, who, being over 100 years old, had had a stroke.
    The doctor, being a caring person, stopped to aid the man who fell over, unconscious.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It would be bad English to add 'being', first because it is quite unnecessary and not idiomatic even if these participle clauses are mainly used on writing. This how you do it - '... caring for the bearded man who had fallen unconscious to the ground'.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Being' is not used with adjectives that describe the subject and are in a position where they (look as if they) could be adverbs:

    He fell down unconscious.
    He left the meeting angry.
    He walked around naked.
    He turned up to work drunk.

    In the first of these sentences you could use a comma before the adjective, but not in the others. They are joined more closely than that: the adjective is not an added extra.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You can avoid the ambiguity of the original sentence by re-casting it with one that was more specific.

    A bearded man fell to the ground and was knocked unconscious and was being attended to by a doctor. (The fall caused the man to become unconscious.)

    A bearded man lost consciousness and fell to the ground and was being attended to by the doctor. (The loss of consciousness caused the fall.)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    A doctor is caring for the bearded man (who fell down on the ground unconscious.)
    That sentence has parentheses. The part in parentheses is not part of the sentence grammar. It is a "parenthetical comment".

    It isn't clear how this sentence would be written without parentheses. There might be commas in it.

    A doctor is caring for the bearded man who fell down on the ground, being unconscious.
    That is a different sentence, without parentheses. Now the phrase "who fell..." is part of the sentence grammar.
     
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