A dog ran up and licked my hand

0396

Member
Korean
These are all my own sentences.

a. A dog ran up and licked my hand.


Q1. What's your interpretation of (a)?

b. A dog ran up (my leg) and licked my hand. (I'm standing)
c. A dog ran up (to me) and licked my hand.
d. A dog ran up (on my knee) and licked my hand (I'm sitting)


Q2. Could (e) mean the same thing as (d)? And can I use "to" instead of "on", as in (f)?

e. A dog ran up my knee and licked my hand. (I'm sitting)
f. A dog ran up to my knee and licked my hand ( " )
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Q1: c.
    Q2: Your example e. gives me the impression that this is a particularly small and agile dog capable of climbing up your knee like a cockroach, for instance. :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Yes boozer, a cockroach or a flea. :eek:
    None of the sentences give me the idea that the speaker may be sitting down.
     

    0396

    Member
    Korean
    @velisarius, or anyone, is your answer to my Q1 same as boozer's, which is (c)? Right off, what's your reading of the sentence(a), if it's not one of those listed in the OP, can you provide your own sentence, please?

    If you're sitting on a sofa, don't you think (a) could mean (d)?

    d. A dog ran up on my knee and licked my hand.

    And don't you think (d) as it is a correct sentence?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Your sentence "A dog ran up and licked my hand." tells me that a dog ran to you and then licked your hand. It has no implication whatsoever that you were standing still, not standing still, sitting, kneeling or lying down. It says nothing at all about your leg or your knee. You seem to be confusing the standard use of "to run" with the phrasal verb "to run up".

    Standard use: "A dog ran up the hill".
    Phrasal verb: "A dog ran up to me". Note the second preposition and indirect object "to me".

    Your sentence: "
    A dog ran up {to me} and licked my hand." The indirect object has been omitted because it is not needed. It is implied by "and licked my hand".

     

    Silver_Biscuit

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    In all my years, I've never seen a dog run up someone's leg. I have seen a scared cat do it, but dogs generally aren't the best climbers. I have, however, seen dogs jump up at people's legs or jump up onto their laps if they are sitting down.
     

    0396

    Member
    Korean
    Thanks everyone!

    @Andy:

    Standard use: "A dog ran up the hill". ---> This one has "up" in its basic spatial sense, the opposite of "down", and it is a prepostion of "path"

    Phrasal verb: "A dog ran up to me". Note the second preposition and indirect object "to me". ---> What you call "indirect object", I would call it a Goal-phrase, though they are two diffrent names employed in two different branches of linguistics or grammar. Here, up is about direction, and is in its basic spatial sense, as well.

    Your sentence: "A dog ran up {to me} and licked my hand." ---> up here conveys something like "approaching" and as you said, the Goal phrase is implied by "and licked my hand". You're amazing Andy. That's exactly the reason. My question was, if the Goal is to be inferred from the context of utterance, where the dog in that sentence ends up(=Goal) in a native speaker's mind.
    Your answers all point to (c). I must say I was crazy to think 'run up' somehow means 'jump up' in (d). I can't even seem to recall what was the exact point of question going in at this point. :)

    Edit: Oops, the second sentence also has up in the sense of approaching. I thought it was "A dog ran up to the hill"
     
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