a double room with bathroom

eli7

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
Greetings,
There is a situation and a question related to it.
You'd like a room for you and your wife or husband, with a bathroom. What do you say?
"I'd like a double room with en suite bathroom, please".

What does "bathroom" here mean? Does it mean "shower" or "restroom/W.C"?
I have heard that some people use them interchangeably, but I guess it must be related to different accents like British or American.
Am I right? if yes, would you please tell me which ones are American and which ones are British?

And, why would a couple reserve a double room? (each person in one different room).Why don't they reserve a twin-bedded room? I just don't get it!
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In BE, I would say, "I'd like a double room with en suite, please".

    "En suite" means "with a bathroom (and toilet) attached."

    "A double room" is one room suitable for two adults.

    "A double room" may contain either two single beds or one double bed.
    And, why would a couple reserve a double room? (each person in one different room).Why don't they reserve a twin-bedded room? I just don't get it!
    You are confusing

    And, why would a couple reserve a double room? (Sufficient sleeping space for two adults).
    with
    And, why would a couple reserve two rooms? (Each person in one different room).
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Usage differs from one type of English to another.

    In the U.S., a double room is a room for two people. Usually, they share a bed. It does not mean two rooms with each person in one of them.

    A bathroom, again in U.S. usage, has a toilet, a sink, and a bathtub with shower (or, in less expensive hotels, just a shower).

    We don't use the term "en-suite" in the U.S. If a hotel room has a bathroom, that bathroom is almost always en-suite - always, if the building was built as a hotel. In some homes that were converted to bed-and-breakfast hotels, some of the bathrooms may be outside the room, but that is rare and would be described separately.

    I'll let someone from the U.K. discuss BE usage.

    Added in edit: Cross-posted. I see someone already did.
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Thanks a million Paul :)
    So is "one double bed" synonymous with " twin-bedded"?

    And what about "bathroom"? Does it mean "W.c" or "shower" here?
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Usage differs from one type of English to another.

    A bathroom, again in U.S. usage, has a toilet, a sink, and a bathtub with shower (or, in less expensive hotels, just a shower).
    Thanks a lot Egmont :)
    What about the British definition of bathroom? does it mean the same as it is used in the U.S?
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Thank you JulianStuart :)

    I'm still looking forward to a kind response to my question about "bathroom".
    An old teacher of mine had told me that bathroom has different meanings in American and British language. I wonder if she was correct because she was not a native.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    She was correct. "Bathroom" in AE implies a toilet. In BE, bathroom implies a room with a bath.

    Traditionally, in Britain, the bathroom (the room with a bath) was a separate room from the [room with a] toilet and so each room has its own name.

    "To go to the bathroom" is a euphemism that is used in BE but it is not as common as the literal "to go to the toilet/WC/loo."

    If you are at a friend's house:

    You: "Where's the bathroom?"
    Friend: "Bathroom? You want a bath?"
    You: "No, I want to use your loo."
    Friend: "Ah! The loo is at the top of the stairs next to the bathroom."

    So you would say:
    You: "Where's the toilet/WC/loo?"
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You should not be: Miss Julie is correct: "In this context, bath = bathtub in AE." I was under the impression that you were asking about the general and common use of "bathroom", Miss Julie (I believe) is referring to hotel rooms.

    Also, in the UK, we expect a bathroom (in a hotel) to have a bath (and/or shower) and a toilet.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Twin beds - two single beds.
    Double bed - one large bed for two people.
    Some of us, ahem, larger individuals do not consider a double bed "large." :D

    Beds, from small to large, go twin-double (or "full")-queen-king.
    Also, in the UK, we expect a bathroom (in a hotel) to have a bath (and/or shower) and a toilet.
    In the US, we expect a hotel bathroom to have a toilet and shower, and maybe half the time the shower has a bathtub as well.
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    In American English, a bathroom can either contain a toilet, sink, and shower and/or bathtub, or just a toilet and sink (or multiple toilets and sinks) such as public bathrooms in stores and restaurants. Many houses do have bathrooms with just a sink and toilet, and you may see them referred to as "half bathrooms" or "half baths". If you were looking on a realtor's website at houses for sale, you might see in the description that one of the houses as 4 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms. This means two of the bathrooms have a toilet, sink, and a shower (with or without a bathtub - I can't recall ever being in a full, private bathroom that had a bathtub, but no shower; however, I've been in many that have a shower and no bathtub), and one of the bathrooms contains just a sink and toilet. I, personally, would use the terms "half bathroom" and "half bath" for descriptive purposes only (such as putting the house up for sale, designing a layout for a new house, describing my house to a friend, etc.) If I needed to use someone's bathroom, I would never ask, "May I use the half bath?", I would simply ask, "May I use the bathroom?"

    In the context of a hotel, I've never had to request a room with a bathroom because all hotels I've been to include a private bathroom with each room. In most cases, the bathroom contains a toilet, sink and a shower (some with and some without a bathtub), but I've stayed in a few places where there is a shower (with or without a tub) and sink in one room, and a toilet and sink in separate, smaller room (and I would call both of those rooms—the one with the shower and the one with the toilet—bathrooms). Whether the room comes with a single full bathroom or two separate bathrooms, in the US, we expect a shower (there may or may not be a bathtub), a sink, and a toilet when we stay at a hotel.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Also, in the UK, we expect a bathroom (in a hotel) to have a bath (and/or shower) and a toilet.
    Agreed, but I would go further and say that if it is described as a "bathroom", then it must have a bath. The shower, if present, would be in addition, not instead.
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    In American English, a bathroom can either contain a toilet, sink, and shower and/or bathtub, or just a toilet and sink (or multiple toilets and sinks) such as public bathrooms in stores and restaurants. Many houses do have bathrooms with just a sink and toilet, and you may see them referred to as "half bathrooms" or "half baths". If you were looking on a realtor's website at houses for sale, you might see in the description that one of the houses as 4 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms. This means two of the bathrooms have a toilet, sink, and a shower (with or without a bathtub - I can't recall ever being in a full, private bathroom that had a bathtub, but no shower; however, I've been in many that have a shower and no bathtub), and one of the bathrooms contains just a sink and toilet. I, personally, would use the terms "half bathroom" and "half bath" for descriptive purposes only (such as putting the house up for sale, designing a layout for a new house, describing my house to a friend, etc.) If I needed to use someone's bathroom, I would never ask, "May I use the half bath?", I would simply ask, "May I use the bathroom?"

    In the context of a hotel, I've never had to request a room with a bathroom because all hotels I've been to include a private bathroom with each room. In most cases, the bathroom contains a toilet, sink and a shower (some with and some without a bathtub), but I've stayed in a few places where there is a shower (with or without a tub) and sink in one room, and a toilet and sink in separate, smaller room (and I would call both of those rooms—the one with the shower and the one with the toilet—bathrooms). Whether the room comes with a single full bathroom or two separate bathrooms, in the US, we expect a shower (there may or may not be a bathtub), a sink, and a toilet when we stay at a hotel.
    Thank you all, and special thanks to vivace160 for his complete and long explanation. Thanks a mot :)

    To come into a conclusion, as far as I understood, a "bathroom" should contain a toilet and a bath (and shower is additional, though most of the hotels or houses have it)
    And W.c / loo is a toilet with sink. (no bath and no shower). Am I right?

    What about restroom? is it synonymous with the "toilet"? and is it an American or British word?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    A WC/loo is the porcelain toilet unit itself or the room containing the toilet. The basin is usually present, but the basin is not an absolute necessity for the room to be called a WC/loo or toilet.

    As far as restrooms are concerned, if there are no previous threads on this, I'll leave it to AE speakers as we don't use the word in the UK. :)
     

    Wordnip

    Senior Member
    British English
    Perhaps I should add that it is not uncommon in the UK or here in Australia to ask, as a guest in someone else's home, "may I use the bathroom?' or 'where is the bathroom?'. This is an over-polite way of asking if one may use the W.C/loo, call it what you will. I neither like nor use this expression.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... To come into a conclusion, as far as I understood, a "bathroom" should contain a toilet and a bath (and shower is additional, though most of the hotels or houses have it)
    I would say that a shower is required, a bathtub is not. If a bathtub is present, one usually stands in the bathtub to use the shower.

    ...What about restroom? is it synonymous with the "toilet"? and is it an American or British word?
    A restroom is usually a public room in a restaurant, theater, etc., that has a toilet and a sink but no shower/bathtub. (I would not call the bathroom in a hotel room a restroom.) A restroom often has multiple toilets and sinks so several people can use it at once. If it is designed for several people, U.S. culture calls for separate restrooms for men and women. A men's restroom, or "men's room," usually also has urinals.
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    I agree with everything Egmont said. Restroom and bathroom are interchangeable when it comes to the rooms available for public use, but some people prefer to use the word restroom (or "mens' room" or "ladies' room") while in public because some consider it more polite than bathroom.

    I would never use w.c. or loo. W.c. sounds very old-fashioned, while loo sounds very British. I can't remember ever hearing anyone use w.c., and the very few times I've heard an American use the word loo, it was done in jest.
     

    dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    Note that "a twin-bed" is a single bed for one person, at least in AE.

    So a "twin-bedded room" is ambiguous: a room with a twin bed? Or a room with two beds? Or a room with two twin beds???

    Wikipedia has a long article on bed-size terminology, including a discussion of the different terms used regionally/internationally:

    Wikipedia article on bed-size terminology

    In my experience, most hotel rooms in America have either:
    • A single queen-sized bed
    • Two queen-sized beds
    • A single king-sized bed

    In the context of a hotel booking, a "double room" would usually mean a room for two. (Some hotels used to charge an additional fee for more than one person per room; this seems rare now.) If you really wanted two rooms, you'd probably ask for "a suite" or a "two-bedroom room", or something like that.
     
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