A duck taped with tape taken from a Duck

. 1

Banned
Australian Australia
A duck taped with tape taken from a Duck Tape duct tape dealer is a Duck Tape duct taped duck indeed.

Does the suspended sentence make sense?

.,,
 
  • NealMc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi

    A duck, taped with tape, taken from a Duck Tape duct tape dealer, is a Duck Tape duct taped duck indeed.

    Yes, with commas and if you suspend your disbelief that duct tape becomes duck tape once it's been applied to a duck. Clear punctuation was never the point of a tongue twister however........

    Cheers
    Neal Mc
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    NealMc said:
    Hi

    A duck, taped with tape, taken from a Duck Tape duct tape dealer, is a Duck Tape duct taped duck indeed.

    Yes, with commas and if you suspend your disbelief that duct tape becomes duck tape once it's been applied to a duck. Clear punctuation was never the point of a tongue twister however........

    Cheers
    Neal Mc
    I think there might be one comma too many. "taken from a Duck Tape duct tape dealer" is a restrictive clause modifying "tape", so I don't think we need that comma between "tape" and "taken". Thus:

    A duck, taped with tape taken from a Duck Tape duct tape dealer, is a Duck-Tape-duct-taped duck indeed.

    I'm a hyphenator in such situations; I realize not everyone is.

    Of course, if we want to specify that it must be this particular kind of Duck Tape from this particular kind of source, we need to punctuate differently:

    A duck taped, with tape taken from a Duck Tape duct tape dealer, is a...

    (Help! Stop me before I punctuate again!)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top