A fall into the(a) pit, a gain in your wit.

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Dear All,


I run across the term "A fall into the(a) pit, a gain in your wit." when I first learned how to combine proverb with my speech, so since that moment I guess this term sounds fine and makes sense to native English speakers, but just now I asked one of my good friend, he is a native English speaker, according to him, it doesn't make too much sense though he understands instantly when he read it, but I wonder what your opinion is?

Let me also create a context to help you with the understanding:

--Do you know Silver was cheated by a call girl out of all his pocket money?

--Yeah, I saw his complaints on his blog, he deserved it.

--Sure, A fall into the pit, a gain in his wit. I think he won't do that next time.


Thanks a lot
 
  • Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Wit is one of those dandy old English words which is well known as something which amuses. Its other not so popular meanings are related to sanity, ingenuity and acumen. That is the usage in your pithy gain in his wit. In my opinion it all means that he learned a lesson by falling into a pit.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I fear that this is another of those olde English sayings that exist mainly in lists of olde English sayings published for learners of the language.

    Instead, we might say "no pain no gain".
     
    Last edited:

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I fear that this is another of those olde English sayings that exist mainly in lists of olde English sayings published for learners of the language.

    Instead, we might say "no pain no gain".

    Can you tell me what you meant by "olde"?

    Thanks
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm afraid it's more of your 'antiquated English', Silver;):D.

    A possible alternative would be "once bitten, twice shy".
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I'm afraid it's more of your 'antiquated English', Silver;):D.

    A possible alternative would be "once bitten, twice shy".

    ;)

    Curiously, I can find the counterpart of "once bitten, twice shy" in Chinese, and also there is a Chinese translation for "no pain, no gain", one reason for me to ask the question is because there is also a counterpart of "a fall into a pit, a gain in your wit."

    Just like Harry said, I learned my lesson by making a mistake.

    Thanks a lot, Loob.
     

    Silver_Biscuit

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    'No pain, no gain' has a different meaning - it doesn't imply profiting by your mistakes, as 'once bitten, twice shy' does, but intentionally putting yourself through suffering for a good cause (e.g. wearing yourself out with exercise in order to get fit).
     
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