a family member has been dead for X years

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
Is it appropriate to say of your family member:
he's been dead for X years?
What about: he's not been with us for X years.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    It seems appropriate to me, after all it's a member of your family, so you get to choose.
    That said, for those who use like euphemisms, I would expect that the greater the X, the smaller the need for a 'mild alternative'.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The way you express this and how you feel about it are really cultural/personal issues rather than language ones. The abundance of options suggests that we do not all feel the same and some people prefer not to talk directly of death.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The way you express this and how you feel about it are really cultural/personal issues rather than language ones. The abundance of options suggests that we do not all feel the same and some people prefer not to talk directly of death.
    I've just been wondering how a student of English can express that in relation to any person who was dear for them in the context of using 'since' and 'for' with the Present Perfect.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Gone" is at best ambiguous. Unless there's a preceding statement making it clear that the person's dead, "he's been gone for X years" could simply mean that he left home, or left town.
     
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