a famous personality

< Previous | Next >

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
"To be a famous personality has its advantages and its disadvantages."
I have a question about "to be". Is it correct? If I omit "to be", is it correct?
Thanks.
 
  • coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    Yes, "To be a famous personality" and "Being a famous personality" would each function as the subject of the sentence; both are correct.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    But which is better because I have to choose either this or that. I can't choose both.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    1.Being a famous personality has its advantages and its disadvantages.
    2.To be a famous personality has its advantages and its disadvantages.
    Are they the same? Are they different?
    Please tell me:
    What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?
    Thanks.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1.Being a famous personality has its advantages and its disadvantages.
    2.To be a famous personality has its advantages and its disadvantages.
    Are they the same? Are they different?
    Please tell me:
    What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?
    Thanks.
    Hello mimi,

    The sun was going down with you some time ago. I hope you're not staying up too late.

    I'm with Coiffe. Being a famous personality... is better

    I find it hard to say why. Perhaps because to be could mean in order to be - not in this case but one might think this was how the sentence was starting - as in To be a famous personality you have to have a great deal of luck.

    But being is, to my ear, a bit clearer and more direct.

    Both are perfectly acceptable, but I'd put being.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi,Thomas.
    Yes, It is very dark outside. My sun is sleeping now. It is so late and I have to go to bed too.
    Thank you, Thomas,for your help.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    A thought has finally made it to the surface - triggered by Thomas Tompion's example sentence.
    Is there a sense in which we expect a sentence beginning "To be a ..." to continue as if it had begun with "To become a ..."?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top