a feather in your cap

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sibu

Senior Member
I am not sure how (and whether) to use the idiom "a feather in your cap". I am aware of its meaning, though. Could I say

We won the football match yesterday! - That is definitely a feather in your cap.

Does this sound clunky (few people still wear hats or feathers these days)?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's rather an old-fashioned phrase these days, but in any case it marks a personal achievement. In what way is our team's winning a personal achievement for one person; who is it you are speaking to? The manager?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The speaker seems to be saying "Thanks to you, we won".
    If the speaker is one of the players and "you" is the manager, the whole thing seems unlikely, as only the most fawning of players would talk in this way.

    I don't hear "a feather in your cap" very often now. I agree with Jack that it's rather old-fashioned.

    In any case, "That's a feather in your cap" is usually said by a person of superior status to the person being addressed, so it can sound patronising.
     

    sibu

    Senior Member
    :thumbsup:
    The speaker seems to be saying "Thanks to you, we won".
    If the speaker is one of the players and "you" is the manager, the whole thing seems unlikely, as only the most fawning of players would talk in this way.

    I don't hear "a feather in your cap" very often now. I agree with Jack that it's rather old-fashioned.

    In any case, "That's a feather in your cap" is usually said by a person of superior status to the person being addressed, so it can sound patronising.
    Thanks! :thumbsup:
     
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