A fellow's getting off some funny stuff

Tea Addict

Senior Member
Republic of Korea Korean
Hello everyone. I would like to know what "A fellow's getting off some funny stuff" means in the following sentences:

Tom appeared from his oblivion as we were sitting down to supper together. "Do you mind if I eat with some people over here?" he said. "A fellow's getting off some funny stuff."
"Go ahead," answered Daisy genially, "and if you want to take down any addresses here's my little gold pencil."

This is an excerpt from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Tom, Daisy and Nick came to Gatsby's party. Although they originally intended to supper together, Tom asked them if he could join some other group, whereupon his wife Daisy let him.

In this part, I could not understand what exactly "to get off" means. Does it mean that someone was telling a very funny tale...?
I would very much appreciate your help. :)
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, I agree it seems to. It's not what we'd say now, or 1920s speech I recognize, but that seems most likely.
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear Barque and entangledbank,

    Thank you very much for the explanation.
    Its meaning seemed very vague to me, probably because I am not used to this kind of construction or word choice, but now I understood it thanks to you. :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Just to add - this definition of get off from the Cassell's Dictionary of Slang would appear to reinforce the interpretation above:
    get off v.4 [late 19C+] (Aus.)(US) to make a joke, a witticism, e.g. get off a good one
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear Loob,

    Oh, I didn't know there was such a definition!
    Thank you very much, it certainly reinforced our interpretation!
    I really appreciate your help. :)
     
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