a festival at London's Hyde Park

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
1. Celine Dion is going to perform at London's Hyde Park this summer.
2. Celine Dion is going to perform at London Hyde Park this summer.

(My sentences.)
Is it OK to omit the possessive 's' in sentence 2?
I understand that the word "London's" has a descriptive function. It does not say that Hyde Park belongs to London, does it.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No. It wouldn’t be said like that at all.

    London Hyde Park :cross:
    The London Hyde Park :cross:
    London’s Hyde Park :tick:
    Hyde Park, London :tick:
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Does the word "London's" in "London's Hyde Park" have an adjectval meaning, as the word "children's" in "children's clothes"?

    I asked the question because the sentence "Josie, Olivia, Ryan and Charlie meet at the Sunshine Cafe in London Hyde Park on Sundays." needs to be corrected, as well as other sentences, e.g.: "Josie sister is Olivia."
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t see the point of trying to pigeonhole it as adjectival. This use of a possessive suggests, and is an alternative for, a prepositional construction.

    London’s Hyde Park – Hyde Park, in London
    children’s clothes – clothes for children
    Poland’s capital – the capital of Poland​
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Would it have to be "the London Hyde Park" as in "the Berlin Wall"?
    The Berlin Wall is Berlin's Berlin Wall (though I doubt anyone would say that - many cities have a Hyde Park, there are probably very few, if any, other Berlin Walls). :)
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I was trying to think of other examples of that construction.
    How about these:
    New York's Central Park is very big.
    Poland's national stadium is in Warsaw.
     
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