< a few more hours > vs a < few hours more >

OED Loves Me Not

Senior Member
Japanese - Osaka
Hello, friends. Could any of you take a minute and read this?

(1) Dr. Jordan said quietly, “Your wife is dying, John. She has a few hours more, that's all.”
(2) It's down to just a few hours more before the Lions vs The All Blacks match.
Both sentences are viewable on the Internet. I'm afraid I can't paste the links here due to a temporary
problem on my part.

Could you please tell me if "a few hours more" above can be replaced with "a few more hours"
and still carry the same meaning? Are there any shades of meaning between the two?

Thank you very much for your time.
 
  • OED Loves Me Not

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Osaka
    Thank you for your answer. Can there be any situations where either of the two
    different phrases is unacceptable? Can both phrases be used in any other situation?
    For example, can the phrase "three hours more" be replaced with "three more hours"
    and still carry the same meaning in the following passage?
    Replay now had actual data to prove that its new customers watched, on average,
    three hours more television each week than they did before they got the box.
    (Source: New York Times, viewable on the Internet)
     

    aceofpace

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    In that case for "three more hours" to be acceptable you would need an "of" right after it.
     

    OED Loves Me Not

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Osaka
    Thank you. I understand now that an "of" is required. Other than that,
    are both phrases acceptable in the above New York Times quote?
    That is, can "three hours more (of)" be replaced with "three more hours (of)"
    to carry the same meaning?
     
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