A film star who is no longer popular.

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

Is there a word to describe a film or tv star who is no longer popular but once very popular?

Can I say "passe star"?

Thanks a lot
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Please give us context and a sentence: answers can vary from washed-up to has-been to former. Context will tell us what mood you want: positive, neutral or negative.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Please give us context and a sentence: answers can vary from washed-up to has-been to former. Context will tell us what mood you want: positive, neutral or negative.
    I am sorry for missing the context, but I don't do that deliberately. I saw a film star who used to be very popular when I was young coming to my city to have a personal show. And now he is no longer popular, he is not known by young people.

    Here I would like to give another example. A singer who once was very popular for her songs, but ten years later a few people know her. Probably she was famous for one song but after the song is no longer popular, she's not popular either.

    Is it enough?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    An interesting question because this is the sort of thing that can vary a great deal according to who is saying it and their attitude to the star being described, as copyright has pointed out.

    Journalists might even coin fresh phrases to do this job in their writing.

    Some exaples that spring to mind: A star of yester-year. A faded star.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Phrases/words I would use include:-
    • A has been
    • Washed up
    • Past his/her sell-by date
    • Out of vogue
    • and of course passé. (French origin but in the English dictionaries).
    There are many more.

    GF..
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is starting to be a list exercise, Silver. ;)

    Let's have a sentence and mood: positive, neutral or negative; formal or informal? You have also confused this conversation with both film star and singer, so please narrow that down.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    You've given us the facts, but not the mood you would like to convey: positive, neutral or negative; formal or informal?
    Thanks a lot for your responsibleness. I think it should be in a positive mood and formal one. But if you can tell me all the possible terms, I will be appreciative of what you have done. Of course, I am thankful of you all's help.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thanks a lot for your responsibleness. I think it should be in a positive mood and formal one. But if you can tell me all the possible terms, I will be appreciative of what you have done. Of course, I am thankful of you all's help.
    Quite a feat to convey an essentially negative message with a positive tone. How about he/she is 'not the force of old'? Or you coud simply try pinning the blame on a fickle and novelty hungry public.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    But if you can tell me all the possible terms, I will be appreciative of what you have done.
    First, you've been around long enough to know we don't do lists. Second, you have confused the question with "film star" and "singer," for which there may be (often are) different terms. Third, you still haven't provided the requested sentence. And fourth, you've already received many answers.

    Considering all that, I'm closing this thread.
     
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