a first-ever nationwide revolt vs a first nationwide revolt

  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    They should both mean pretty much the same thing, Thuhoai. Using "first-ever" sounds more emphatic. It emphasizes the idea that this is the first time that it has ever happened. "First" by itself really means the same thing, though.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Owlman about "first-ever", and it's what I'd use in that situation.

    Just plain "first" could sound as if there are other revolts in store: This is the first nationwide revolt; another is scheduled for next month.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top