a fixed payment amount made vs. a fixed amount of payment made

Faisal_Ahmad

Senior Member
India - English
Which of the following sentences is/are correct?

1. EMI is a fixed payment amount made by a borrower to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.
2. EMI is a fixed amount of payment made by a borrower to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.
3. EMI is a fixed payment amount given by a borrower to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.

In my opinion, sentences 2 and 3 are correct.

Reason: a fixed amount of payment (noun phrase) made (verb phrase)
Reason: a fixed payment amount (noun phrase) given (verb phrase)

Please cite grammatical reasons for your answers.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    In my view, none of these is fluent English. "Payment amount" is not a normal phrase, nor is "make/give payment". The best solution is simply:

    EMI is a fixed amount paid by a borrower to a lender...

    Now, you ask for grammatical reasons and I have none. "The green milk cries happily into the festival" is grammatically a perfectly good sentence. But it just happens to be nonsense. Your three suggested options are grammatically defensible, but they're not good ways of expressing the idea.
     

    Faisal_Ahmad

    Senior Member
    India - English
    In my view, none of these is fluent English. "Payment amount" is not a normal phrase, nor is "make/give payment". The best solution is simply:

    EMI is a fixed amount paid by a borrower to a lender...

    Now, you ask for grammatical reasons and I have none. "The green milk cries happily into the festival" is grammatically a perfectly good sentence. But it just happens to be nonsense. Your three suggested options are grammatically defensible, but they're not good ways of expressing the idea.
    Hello Keith! Thanks for the reply.

    I like the sentence you propose. However, are you sure the phrase "to make payment" is not a normal phrase?

    I can see this instance that Oxford suggests as an example:
    • Now imagine what kind of job you need to make that sort of monthly payment.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ... However, are you sure the phrase "to make payment" is not a normal phrase?

    I can see this instance that Oxford suggests as an example:
    • Now imagine what kind of job you need to make that sort of monthly payment.
    Ah, but now you've changed the construction! To make that sort of payment is OK; to make a payment is certainly OK; but to make payment with no qualifier is rare.
     

    Faisal_Ahmad

    Senior Member
    India - English
    Ah, but now you've changed the construction! To make that sort of payment is OK; to make a payment is certainly OK; but to make payment with no qualifier is rare.
    So, considering your recognition now, is the following sentence not valid?

    EMI is a fixed amount of payment made by a borrower to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.

    OR


    EMI is a fixed amount of payment a borrower makes to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.
    Ah, but now you've changed the construction! To make that sort of payment is OK; to make a payment is certainly OK; but to make payment with no qualifier is rare.
    Thanks! I liked it...
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    So, considering your recognition now, is the following sentence not valid?

    EMI is a fixed amount of payment made by a borrower to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.

    OR

    EMI is a fixed amount of payment a borrower makes to a lender at a specified date each calendar month...
    Yes, both of these are grammatically valid. But "pay" is still shorter, simpler and clearer than "make a payment"! There is a general rule in English style, that shorter and simpler is better. Why waste your time and your reader's time with unnecessarily long sentences?
     

    Faisal_Ahmad

    Senior Member
    India - English
    Yes, both of these are grammatically valid. But "pay" is still shorter, simpler and clearer than "make a payment"! There is a general rule in English style, that shorter and simpler is better. Why waste your time and your reader's time with unnecessarily long sentences?
    Yes Keith. I do agree with you.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    An equated monthly installment (EMI) is a fixed payment amount made by a borrower to a lender at a specified date each calendar month.
    This is the definition given by one of the online business dictionaries (investorwords.com) and is identical with the OP's first sentence, except that the OP omitted the full phrase and gave only the abbreviation. [Faisal: Is that where you got the sentence? You didn't give your source.]

    It's okay, in my opinion, with two exceptions: I would omit the unnecessary word "amount", and I would change the preposition "at" to on.
     

    Faisal_Ahmad

    Senior Member
    India - English
    This is the definition given by one of the online business dictionaries (investorwords.com) and is identical with the OP's first sentence, except that the OP omitted the full phrase and gave only the abbreviation. [Faisal: Is that where you got the sentence? You didn't give your source.]

    It's okay, in my opinion, with two exceptions: I would omit the unnecessary word "amount", and I would change the preposition "at" to on.
    I am not quite sure of the source as I found this sentence in a document I need to proofread. Anyways, I appreciate the contribution from all of you. Thanks!
     
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