a flake of paint

Hotmale

Senior Member
Polish
Hi,
I've got another problem. What is the word for "flake" in Polish other than "(o)drobina"?
"Płatek" doesn't seem right to me either.
Have you got any ideas?

"She scrubbed at a flake of paint on the doorjamb with a chapped fingertip."

Thanks
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Po polsku powiedziałbym poporstu:
    zeskrobywał odpadającą farbę

    A co do samego tłumaczenia flake to myślę, że płat jest ok. Dodam tylko, że można by było powiedzieć też (odpadający/odrywający się) kawałek.



    Tom

    PS: całe zdanie jest trochę dziwne.
     

    Seana

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Yes I think płat błota (a flake of mud) is good but it could also be said
    - gruda błota (a clod of mud);
    - kawałek błota (a little piece of mud);
    - kawał błota ( a large piece of mud);
    - resztka błota ( rest of mud);
    - warstwa błota (a layer? spoil? of mud).
     

    Hotmale

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Yes I think płat błota (a flake of mud) is good but it could also be said
    - gruda błota (a clod of mud);
    - kawałek błota (a little piece of mud);
    - kawał błota ( a large piece of mud);
    - resztka błota ( rest of mud);
    - warstwa błota (a layer? spoil? of mud).

    Thanks, Seana for your suggestion :) .


    A little/large piece of mud sounds strange. I think a bit of mud is better.
    The rest of mud I believe is incorrect. You can say a (remaining) splatter of mud or a clump of mud, if it's a solid mass.

    How to translate it well, is another thing :)

    Have a nice day,
    Hotmale
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thanks mates!



    trochę :)

    PS. What about a flake of mud? Is it translatable?

    X of błoto?
    What's the context please?

    Seriously, is flake used with mud at all in English? Flake is supposed to be thin, sheetlike, but mud is not so. I would say a piece/lump/layer of mud but flake doesn't do the job well, at least to me. Even in Polish it sounds bad. Anyway, I don't want to be categorical of course since there may be context about which people haven't dreamt yet, in which it chimes in; so if you provide a context that explains away/justifies the use of flake with mud I am likely to change my point of view. :)


    Tom
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    What's the context please?

    Seriously, is flake used with mud at all in English? Flake is supposed to be thin, sheetlike, but mud is not so. I would say a piece/lump/layer of mud but flake doesn't do the job well, at least to me. Even in Polish it sounds bad. Anyway, I don't want to be categorical of course since there may be context about which people haven't dreamt yet, in which it chimes in; so if you provide a context that explains away/justifies the use of flake with mud I am likely to change my point of view. :)


    Tom
    I've wondered about this, too. I suppose it is not very widespread, otherwise there would be more Google-hits (as of now, there are only six).

    As I imagine it, it's a thin small piece of dried mud (as in a dry puddle or on someone's clothes).

    Consider these examples:

    She said most people will walk right past something interesting – such as a flake of mud that has curled up as it dried out, resembling a chocolate shaving or a scroll of ancient paper – without even giving it a second thought. Source

    My suede boots are soaking, the hem of my skirt splattered with mud. When it dries I will flake it off carefully with my fingernail so as not to ruin the suede; no one will notice. Source

    I must admit I'm having a hard time trying to translate it into Russian.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Looks like I'll have to convert. :D Here are a few more:
    I gazed fixedly at the soft, downy hair that grew in the crease of his earhole, at the tiny flakes of mud attached to his skin, at the graduated wrinkles at the top of his trunk.

    Source
    A thick mass in its final desiccation may show cracking like the hexagonal flakes of mud at the edge of a pond, or the thick axes of a slowly drying […]
    Source

    Usually this happened when the pond had dried down to caked brown flakes of mud clinging to the sides and a slimy green mess at the bottom […]
    Source
    The water felt immediately alleviating, and at last, Eleanor began to relax. Dried flakes of mud melted from her skin and drifted to the surface, clouding the water as she dipped her head back, submerging her crunchy curls.
    Source
    Her mud was already cracked and flaking off
    Source
    From what I can see I think flake if used with mud is a rather rare link. I don’t know if I would use it, but if you insisted on employing it I’d most likely imagine something like this (without any context of course), but even then I’d rather use different wording (e.g. dried, cracked soil/mud). I also think that it is more palatable when used wiht verbal forms. I wonder how natives feel this kind of urge.


    Tom
     

    Hotmale

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Looks like I'll have to convert. :D Here are a few more:



    From what I can see I think flake if used with mud is a rather rare link. I don’t know if I would use it, but if you insisted on employing it I’d most likely imagine something like this (without any context of course), but even then I’d rather use different wording (e.g. dried, cracked soil/mud). I also think that it is more palatable when used wiht verbal forms. I wonder how natives feel this kind of urge.


    Tom
    Hi Tom,
    Indeed, a flake of mud is not a common collocation, but it is not rare either. A google search produces more results when you type in flakes of mud. IMHO the image you attached doesn't show a flake of mud. It is a very solid, dry mass (which flake is not) rather than a thin wet piece of mud.
    Anyway I've aready had this collocation translated. A friend of mine suggested rozbryzg błota, which I like a lot.
    Using it is not about insisting on anything. I was just curious how to translate a seemingly untransaltable phrase into Polish :)

    Regrds,
    Hotmale
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hi Tom,
    Indeed, a flake of mud is not a common collocation, but it is not rare either. A google search produces more results when you type in flakes of mud. IMHO the image you attached doesn't show a flake of mud. It is a very solid, dry mass (which flake is not) rather than a thin wet piece of mud.
    Anyway I've aready had this collocation translated. A friend of mine suggested rozbryzg błota, which I like a lot.
    Using it is not about insisting on anything. I was just curious how to translate a seemingly untransaltable phrase into Polish :)

    Regrds,
    Hotmale
    I said without context, and you haven’t provided it, which makes the possibilities of the translation almost countless. Anyway, the citations I quoted say about the kind of flake I linked to. ;)

    The flake you’re depicting is a kind of a snow flake, which is associated differently in Polish, firstly, because snow brings about connotations, and, secondly, because in this case it translates as diminutive. However, let’s not forget about płat skóry/farby which are dry and the second one’s solid. The description by you doesn’t hold true for me as a general definition of the term in question. Rozbryzg błota sounds somewhat formal to me.

    The total of 36, comparing to 10,500 for “piece of mud” and 9,900 for “lump of mud”, (the plurals have considerably lower counts, though still higher than flake’s, but it’s, I think, a different story) doesn’t convince me.


    Tom
     

    Hotmale

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I said without context, and you haven’t provided it, which makes the possibilities of the translation almost countless. Anyway, the citations I quoted say about the kind of flake I linked to. ;)

    The flake you’re depicting is a kind of a snow flake, which is associated differently in Polish, firstly, because snow brings about connotations, and, secondly, because in this case it translates as diminutive. However, let’s not forget about płat skóry/farby which are dry and the second one’s solid. The description by you doesn’t hold true for me as a general definition of the term in question. Rozbryzg błota sounds somewhat formal to me.

    The total of 36, comparing to 10,500 for “piece of mud” and 9,900 for “lump of mud”, (the plurals have considerably lower counts, though still higher than flake’s, but it’s, I think, a different story) doesn’t convince me.


    Tom
    Do you need context to translate a bottle of milk, a flake of snow, a dash of milk?
    I don't think that a flake of mud can be translated in dozens of ways.
    As I said, it's not a very common collocation, but a collocation nonetheless.
    If it is in my grammar books, then it wasn't listed there by mistake.

    I don't understand the reference to a flake of snow (aren't we discussing a flake of mud) and your saying that "snow brings about connotations" (?).

    Regrds,
    Hotmale


     

    arturolczykowski

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thomas1 wrote:


    Looks like I'll have to convert. :D

    Hi everybody, I'm new here.

    Thomas1, I think that you shouldn't use the word "convert" here. If I understand you properly you should say "I'll have to repent". "Convert" to polish "nawrocenie" but in the meaning of "changing religion" , if you've done something wrong or haven't been right you must "repent" :)
     
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