A flight (A to B & B to A)

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interwrit

Senior Member
Polish
Hi there! :)

Well, let's imagine, we bought a round-trip ticket, are in A and will be flying to B.

So, we'll have 2 flights:
(1) - from A to B.
(2) - from B to A.

How would you call (1) and (2)? Are there terms for them both, for either of them or for none?

Thanks a million in advance! :)
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    The airline I use most often calls them "Departing Flight" and "Returning Flight" on their website. There are probably other terms. (edit: as sound shift's post shows.)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Both suggestions above are fine. In airline terminology, and for mileage rewards computation, each flight is called a sector. It depends on how conversational or technical you wish to be.
     

    interwrit

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Both suggestions above are fine. In airline terminology, and for mileage rewards computation, each flight is called a sector. It depends on how conversational or technical you wish to be.
    Well, as far as a sector goes, I've read somewhere that in AmE it's called a leg.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The WRF dictionary has this defintion of leg (among many others):
    "a section or part of a journey or course"
    My experience is that the use of leg is for complex trips where there are plane changes and each takeoff/landing even is a "leg", rather than for "outbound flight" and "return flight" in a simple round trip.
     

    interwrit

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Well, as far as a sector goes, I've read somewhere that in AmE it's called a leg.
    The WRF dictionary has this defintion of leg (among many others):
    "a section or part of a journey or course"
    My experience is that the use of leg is for complex trips where there are plane changes and each takeoff/landing even is a "leg", rather than for "outbound flight" and "return flight" in a simple round trip.

    Right, to clarify it, I mean (but wrote something different... argh) that the 'a leg' term is one more term related to flying. Copyright wrote that each flight is called a sector. To add, 'a sector' is additionally a part of a flight! So is 'a leg'. So, a flight can have 2 or more sectors/legs and be a sector/leg itself.
     
    Last edited:

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    .
    Having worked in the industry for many years, this is my perception of the various terms used in a commercial context:

    - A trip is a passenger's total journey made in a single reservation. (It may include several flights, e.g. A-B >> B-C-D >> D-A)
    - A flight is the aircraft's total journey from a specified origin to a specified destination; it's usually identified by a given flight number. (It may be single-sector or multi-sector): (A-B, or A-B-C, or A-B-C-D, ...)
    - A sector is a a flight, or part of a flight, that includes only one takeoff and one landing (no intermediate stops). (A-B, or B-C, or C-D, ...)
    - A leg is (mostly in AmE) a lesser-used alternative name for a sector.
    - A segment is occasionally used to mean a sector, though in certain domains (network and traffic planning, yield management, ...) it can also refer to multi-sector parts of a flight (e.g. A-B-C as a segment of flight A-B-C-D).

    That said, both trip and flight can be used differently on the technical operations side of airlines, and differently again by the accountants — whilst pilots have a jargon of their own, and Marketing and PR are a law unto themselves!
    The airline I use most often calls them "Departing Flight" and "Returning Flight" on their website. [...]
    That seems really strange to me, pob. A-B is indeed a departing flight when you leave from airport A; it's then an arriving flight at airport B. For the return trip B-A, your flight is a departing flight from B. Maybe it's the PR people in your airline who thought up those names.:p

    In your example, interwrit, I'd call A-B the outbound flight, and B-A the return flight (very similar to sound shift's suggestion).

    Ws:)
     
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