a flight of delicious cookies

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sev77

Member
French
They created a flight of delicious cookies.

Je ne comprends pas "flight of", s'agit-il de la création d'une gamme de cookies?

Note de la modération : phrase entière déplacée depuis le titre vers le corps du message
 
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  • OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    Mot à mot, ça donne une escadrille de biscuits. Sont-ils aériens ? :)

    Sinon, ce sont peut-être des gradins (comme "a flight of stairs"), en rapport avec leur présentation ?
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    This is slightly pretentious modern food writing.

    On tasting menus these days, a set of (four, six, etc.) small glasses of different varieties of beer presented together gets called "a flight of beer" or "a beer flight." Presumably, the expression has been borrowed to refer to a selection of different and supposedly complementary cookies presented together in an attractive fashion.

    (But there is no need for the presentation to involved tiers or levels, such as on gradins.)
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the uk we have flights of stairs, aircraft, birds and fancy, but not biscuits. Perhaps the sentence refers to a staircase made of biscuits or biscuits in the shape of birds.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is slightly pretentious modern food writing.

    On tasting menus these days, a set of (four, six, etc.) small glasses of different varieties of beer presented together gets called "a flight of beer" or "a beer flight." Presumably, the expression has been borrowed to refer to a selection of different and supposedly complementary cookies presented together in an attractive fashion.

    (But there is no need for the presentation to involved tiers or levels, such as on gradins.)
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
    In the U.S. I have noticed the increasingly popular use of "flight of [insert name of food or beverage here]" on restaurant menus and for tastings.
    It has nothing to do with staircases, airplanes or birds; it simply refers to a sampler or assortment.

    From the OED (emphasis mine):
    A selection of small portions of a particular type of food or drink, esp. wine, intended to be tasted together for the purpose of comparison. 1978 N.Y. Times 29 Mar. c17/2 There were four flights of wines, as they say in the trade, four spätleses, four ausleses,..[etc.]. 1983 Washington Post (Nexis) 14 Dec. e1 They turned the dinner into a smoked salmon tasting... Each flight of the tasting was garnished differently. 1997 Sydney Morning Herald (Nexis) 17 June (Good Living) 2 An inviting line-up of the famous single malt whiskeys available in tasting flights. 2005 L. L. Narlock & N. Garfinkel Wine Lover's Guide Wine Country 151 The tasting bar offers three to six flights of wine in several categories: classic, prestige, all white, and all red.
    From an American restaurant's website:
    For those who’ve never ordered a Flight, it’s a sampler we offer of three different beverages (wine, Port or spirits) that you can order to experience a comparative tasting at your table or the bar.
    Finally, on a wine website, someone wrote the following in answer to the question "Why is a wine flight called a flight?"
    Although I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the response, I think it is interesting nonetheless (highlighting mine):
    Of course ‘flight of wines’ derived from wine judges who could not agree on which group of wines were worth more than $100 but they eventually agreed that the concept of such wine values was a flight of fancy so they jokingly referred to the wines as a ‘flight of fancy wines’ which for professional reasons was reduced to ‘flight of wines’.
     
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