a food to be had

< Previous | Next >

koper2

Senior Member
Polish
Context: There is a hyena, a matriarch of the clan, waiting, under the marula tree, for the bone scraps falling down. And on that tree, there's a leopard feeding on the kill. Then there's a comment of the safari guide: "She's here because there is a food to be had."

Does "had" in the guide's comment is a possessive one or the one that refers to eating?
 
  • koper2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Eating. That's what food is for, after all, and even if a hyena stores food, it'd be to eventually eat it.


    He probably said ...because there is food to be had, without a.
    He said "a food".
    By the way, I've come across such a sentence in fraze.it website: "The adaptation process can be accelerated by varying the way a food is prepared."
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    food to be had -- food to be obtained.
    I agree "obtained" is probably more accurate than my answer of "eating". However I'd still say "eating" is right too, especially as we're talking of a hyena here, not a person who might want to get the food and sell it to someone else, or keep it in his freezer for later.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "The adaptation process can be accelerated by varying the way a food is prepared."
    That's a different use of food. It's equivalent to:

    The adaptation process can be accelerated by varying the way a (specific) food is prepared.

    In the hyena example it's talking about the general concept of food.

    She's here because there is food to be had.

    She's here because there is food available (if she's patient enough to wait for it).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top