a food

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mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
“Milk, often considered nearly perfect food, contains fatness, sweet, and protein.”
I would like to add “a” to food --> a food.
I don't know if it is correct?
Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi, Zap.
    My problem is that milk is an uncountable noun and so is food.
    You put "a" I think you have a reason. What is it?
    Thanks.
     

    Indigo Girl

    Member
    Canada, English
    “Milk, often considered nearly perfect food, contains fatness, sweet, and protein.”
    I would like to add “a” to food --> a food.
    I don't know if it is correct?
    Thanks.
    "Milk, often considered nearly perfect food, contains fat, sugar, and protein."

    I think (correct me if I'm wrong) that you are wanting to add 'a' before food because milk is 'a' type of food.

    You could say: "Milk is often considered a nearly perfect food, as it contains fat, sugar and protein."

    I think it is best the first way though.

    Indigo Girl
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    Hmmm. Your sentence is good; if you wish to insert an "a" put it in front of 'nearly'.

    "Milk, often considered a nearly perfect food, contains fatness, sweetness, and protein."
     

    WongFeiHung

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Another option:
    "Milk, often considered near perfect, contains ..." But I think it would be better to leave the 'food'
    Also, you probably would want to say "fat" instead of "fatness" because "fatness" is the state of being fat.
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    Milk, often considered near perfect, contains fat, sugar, and protein.

    WongFeiHung's beginning and Indigo Girl's end works best. The sentence is short and to the point.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    I agree. Thank you.
    Oh, let me ask you:
    You said "near" but I think "nearly". Why?
     

    Indigo Girl

    Member
    Canada, English
    Another option:
    "Milk, often considered near perfect, contains ..." But I think it would be better to leave the 'food'
    Also, you probably would want to say "fat" instead of "fatness" because "fatness" is the state of being fat.

    Same with "'sugar" instead of "sweetness." Sugar is the name of an ingredient in milk, sweetness refers to the taste.

    When you drink milk, you don't really taste the sweetness, even though it it does contain sugar.

    Make sense?
     
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