A former colleague used to sit at this desk

sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
This is a sentence I made up myself.

A colleague John left the company for a job somewhere else. A new hire comes to sit at the desk. In a conversation about the desk with the new guy, can we use “used to” to express where a former colleague sat in a company as in “John used to sit here”?

Taking this further to generally expressing the idea about what a former colleague did in a company, can we use the phrase “Jonh used to do this (that)… and now you take it over”? (assume the listener knows who John is.)
 
  • wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'And now you take it over' could be valid as a statement and instruction from a manager to the new employee.
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Can we use the phrase “John used to do this (that)… and now you're taking it over”? (Assume the listener knows who John is.) .
    Yes, with the small correction noted. "Used to" is perfect.
    'And now you take it over' could be valid as a statement and instruction from a manager to the new employee.
    So the continous tense as Parla pointed out "and now you're taking it over” would be used in talking to a new collegue on the same level?

    Also, does "John used to sit here" work in the context?
     
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