A four-pronged Linked Response approach

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Camlearner

Senior Member
Khmer
Hi

I read a doc. on AIDS situation in my country and one of the phrase under one HIV patient center image say :

"A four-pronged Linked Response approach
for Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) has increased the quality of services.
"

What does this big noun phrase "A four-pronged Linked Response approach" mean?

Thanks
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You hear pronged all over the place these days -- especially in business conference rooms. Everyone has a two-, three- or four-pronged approach to something. No one ever has a one-pronged approach, which I would find focused and amusing.

    Anyway, a four-pronged approach is like spear with four prongs or points. In this case, the four prongs are:
    1. Primary prevention of HIV infection in women.
    2. Prevention of unintended pregnancy among HIV-infected women.
    3. Interventions to reduce transmission from HIV-infected pregnant and lactating women to their children.
    4. Care and support of women, children and families infected and affected by HIV and AIDS.

    I would guess that the linked response simply means these four prongs are being used in concert... together.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    To me, this is my 1st time that I meet this word -pronged today.

    Thank you Copyright for expalining very well..
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    No, Google results show that there are approximately this many instances of the expression *-pronged on webpages worldwide. That means one-pronged, two-pronged and three-pronged, both with and without the hyphen... plus other prongs I didn't bother looking for.

    This compares to 11,500 hits for one-pronged alone.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Ah I just learned hit means results in your sentence.. I thought it mean visits(n) and beat(v) ! the meaning of hit is many-pronge, can I say?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I find prong an annoying word unless we're talking about a frog gig (gig: an implement with a shaft and barbed point used for catching fish) or something similar that has real-life prongs. When I hear three-pronged approach in a business meeting, I find myself wishing for a gig or a gaff or a gag.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Ahh you mean it's strange for your ears as a native-speaker of English. So it's strange that many hits of the word sponge are born on the google like you just told me. So I feel now interested to know what will you use instead of "A four-pronged approach" to mean same meaning?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    So I feel now interested to know what will you use instead of "A four-pronged approach" to mean same meaning?
    I just avoid it. I would say "Here's how we're going to do this" and list out the ways. If there are four, there are four. The only four-pronged approach I take in life is when I'm dining and pick up my fork.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think that what Copyright is saying is that four-pronged (or three- or whatever) is a popular adjective right now in the business world, what we call a "buzz word", but that he personally prefers a more direct way of speaking.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think that what Copyright is saying is that four-pronged (or three- or whatever) is a popular adjective right now in the business world, what we call a "buzz word", but that he personally prefers a more direct way of speaking.
    If only I had been so direct. Thank you. :)
     
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