A friend of mine has a crush on a boy.

claude23

Banned
FRANCE
Hi,


A friend of mine has a crush on a boy. He's a boy too.
The boy doesn't like boys so i said to my friend you can only or you only can pleased your eyes. May I say that ?


Thank you,

Claude.
 
  • whatonearth

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Neither of those sentences are correct to my mind. From what I understand you are trying to say I would say a comparible phrase would be "You can look but you can't touch", although that may have some different connotations... :)
     

    NealMc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi
    It does depend really - on age and reasons for the crush.

    I might say that someone is "easy on the eye" which means they are good looking - it's a phrase influenced by political correctness and non-objectifying of people sexually (although of course it does objectify people sexually - it's just less overt).

    If the boys are pre-teens and/or there is no sexual element - eg the "crush" is based on perceived "coolness", are you warning him not to blindly follow someone who may not be a good influence?

    Cheers
    Neal Mc
     

    judkinsc

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    There's a fun phrase, though sometimes not polite, which is "eye-candy" (candy for the eyes). You could say, "He's only eye-candy for you. You can't have him." The best way is as Whatonearth said, though: "You can look, but you can't touch", which is a standard idiom.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    A "crush based on perceived coolness"? :confused: Could you elaborate?

    I like the suggestions made thus far, but I do wish to point out that "you can only please your eyes" would be understood - even if it is not a usual way to put it. As for the question about "only please" vs. "please only," I'd say that "please only" is, strictly speaking, more correct but you would be more likely to hear "only please."

    Also, WOE, small typo: comparable.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    elroy said:
    A "crush based on perceived coolness"? :confused: Could you elaborate?

    I like the suggestions made thus far, but I do wish to point out that "you can only please your eyes" would be understood - even if it is not a usual way to put it. As for the question about "only please" vs. "please only," I'd say that "please only" is, strictly speaking, more correct but you would be more likely to hear "only please."

    Also, WOE, small typo: comparable.
    Sorry - I'm not trying to be awkward, but I wouldn't understand it at all if someone said that to me. Following Claude's explanation of the situation and others' suggestions the context seems to suggest that "you can look but you can't touch" is an appropriate phrase.
     

    Rich696

    Senior Member
    England, English
    You could also abbreviate it slightly to a slightly more forceful imperative: "Look but don't touch".

    Or you could just go the simple way and say "he's not gay".
     

    NealMc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi Elroy

    As per your question - a crush based on "coolness" - my explanation

    I perceive the boys to be pre-teen, so the crush does not have a sexual element. In this instance crush can be used to indicate admiration e.g. two 8 year old boys - my school friend wears Levi's and has the newest "Need For Speed". If the boy talks about his cool friend a lot, it can be described as a crush, most usually by a parent. ie there is a clear non sexual context.

    If the boy is the same age as claude (26) - clearly post puberty, then a crush will have a sexual element. If his friend "does not like men" but has a crush on a man, then "look but don't touch" or "eye candy" is unlikely to be used by a group men (who aren't gay) to discuss the sexual attractiveness of other men. Whilst metrosexuality means that men will use moisturiser they will still tend to over-compensate about how not gay they are. Malekind is still some way off encouraging each other to fantasise about homosexual experiences - so I personally would not advocate "look but don't touch". You only need to say that you went to see Brokeback Mountain at the weekend to most men to see them edge away from you......

    Cheers
    Neal Mc
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    NealMc said:
    If the boy talks about his cool friend a lot, it can be described as a crush, most usually by a parent. ie there is a clear non sexual context.
    Interesting - I've never heard "crush" being used that way.
     
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