A friend of mine has offered/invited me to stay at his house in Brighton

hedgy

Senior Member
Catalan
In the Workbook Ready for First by MacMillan 3rd edition (page 96) there is an exercise where you have to choose between two different options (reporting verbs):
A friend of mine has offered/invited me to stay at his house in Brighton
The answer is invited. I guess it is because of the collocation with the verb stay, am I right? Maybe I also doubt because in Spanish people usually use both the verbs offer and invite to say that sentence.
Cheers
 
  • hedgy

    Senior Member
    Catalan
    But I have seen the following examples in an online Oxford dictionary:
    I gratefully took the cup of coffee she offered me
    or
    Taylor offered him 500 dollars to do the work
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    But I have seen the following examples in an online Oxford dictionary:
    I gratefully took the cup of coffee she offered me
    or
    Taylor offered him 500 dollars to do the work
    But these examples are of offer + a noun.
    The original question 'offered me to stay at his house' is different. You could say 'He offered me 500 dollars to stay at his house'.
    Offer is transitive and needs an object.
     
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