a friend of mine

zoila

Member
Chile
I have a doubt realted to:
She is my friend
She is a friend of mine

I'm certain both have the same meanings but what's the difference? Maybe the second option is more formal or more polite?

Thanks
 
  • Julie_UM

    Senior Member
    Argentina, Spanish
    (a) Ella es mi amiga. (La única que tengo o la amiga de la que estábamos hablando)
    (b) Ella es una amiga mía. (Una de tantas que tengo).
     

    ruru2006

    Senior Member
    spanish
    (a) Ella es mi amiga. (La única que tengo o la amiga de la que estábamos hablando)
    (b) Ella es una amiga mía. (Una de tantas que tengo).

    Ella es mi amiga - does not necesarily conveys that she is the only friend I have.
    Ella es mi amiga (de la que estamos hablando/ de la que hablamos/a la que nos referimos), no solo una conocida, compañera...
     

    Jane83

    New Member
    Spain Spanish
    y si dices:
    Is Michael....?
    se dice is Michael a friend of yours? o is Michael your friend?
    y ¿por qué?
    alguien me ayuda?
     

    AlNeri

    Member
    Hola estoy haciendo unos test de inglés pero tengo una duda respecto a esta frase:

    Who is ...? She is a friend of....

    Las respuestas posibles son:

    a) her/me c) her/mine
    b) she/me d) her/my

    Para mí la respuesta correcta no es ninguna de estas, yo diría:

    Who is SHE? She is a friend of MINE. Que no viene como respuesta posible.

    La respuesta que me da las soluciones es la c).

    Sería correcto decir Who is her???!!! No estará equivocado?

    Muchas gracias
     

    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I have a doubt realted to:
    She is my friend
    She is a friend of mine

    I'm certain both have the same meanings but what's the difference? Maybe the second option is more formal or more polite?

    Thanks
    Gramaticalmente laas dos son correctas pero
    En la primera das a entender que sólo tienes una amiga y en la segunda das a entender que tienes más de un amigo/a
     

    ruru2006

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Hola estoy haciendo unos test de inglés pero tengo una duda respecto a esta frase:

    Who is ...? She is a friend of....

    Las respuestas posibles son:

    a) her/me c) her/mine
    b) she/me d) her/my

    Para mí la respuesta correcta no es ninguna de estas, yo diría:

    Who is SHE? She is a friend of MINE. Que no viene como respuesta posible.

    La respuesta que me da las soluciones es la c).

    Sería correcto decir Who is her???!!! No estará equivocado?

    Muchas gracias
    La respuesta correcta es 'c' - who is her? she is a friend of mine.


    Question - What's going on? I keep getting these messages about very old threads and the worse part is that it seems that people are not reading previous answers. e.g. chamyto.

    Again, Chamyto, where you get the idea that if I say "she is my friend" I am saying that 'she is the only friend iI have?
     
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    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Vamos a ver,
    a mí me lo explicaron de esa forma, cuando estudiaba en el instituto y la escuela de idiomas.

    They explained this grammatical point when I studied English.
    She is my friend vs she is a friend of mine

    The idea is obtained with "my" and "mine"
    Yo sigo pensando igual,

    un saludo
     

    ruru2006

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Chamyto
    By any chance - did they ever say, in your flanboyant schools of languages, that there is only one way to say something in English, or that there must exist a reason?

    I grew up in an English-speaking environment. I went to primary, high school, and college in an English-speaking environment and have lived in NYC for 46 years. When I say 'she is my friend' it just mean that in English. It does not mean that she is the only one, or the favorite, it just means that she is a friend of mine
     

    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Chamyto
    By any chance - did they ever say, in your flanboyant schools of languages, that there is only one way to say something in English, or that there must exist a reason?

    I grew up in an English-speaking environment. I went to primary, high school, and college in an English-speaking environment and have lived in NYC for 46 years. When I say 'she is my friend' it just mean that in English. It does not mean that she is the only one, or the favorite, it just means that she is a friend of mine
    I´ll look up if there is a slighty diferent between a frien of mine /// my friend
     

    ruru2006

    Senior Member
    spanish
    I´ll look up if there is a slighty diferent between a frien of mine /// my friend

    I´ll look up if there is a slighty slight diferent difference between a: -- is friend of mine /// -- is my friend

    Do as your heart pleases.... When I was in Junior High, I remember a teacher who used to say "you can't be wrong and strong".
     

    Julie_UM

    Senior Member
    Argentina, Spanish
    Chamyto
    By any chance - did they ever say, in your flanboyant flamboyant schools of languages, that there is only one way to say something in English, or that there must exist a reason?

    I grew up in an English-speaking environment. I went to primary, high school, and college in an English-speaking environment and have lived in NYC for 46 years. When I say 'she is my friend' it just mean that in English. It does not mean that she is the only one, or the favorite, it just means that she is a friend of mine
    ruru2006, I was taught the same Chamyto says here, as I explained above. This does not mean that we never hear people in the streets sometimes use the "ella es mi amiga" sentence to refer to one of several friends, only this doesn't sound academic to me.
    We sometimes make "mistakes" in our own mother tongue. If a Spanish speaker said, "ella es mi amiga", it would either mean that 1. she is the friend we've been talking about / I mentioned before / I was telling you about / we've been waiting for, etc. 2. she is the only friend I have.
    If she were one of all the many friends I have, I would say "ella es una amiga". I think this applies to the English language, too, at least academically speaking. ;)
     
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    chamyto

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Sigo discrepando sobre ello.

    Obviously there are several ways to say something in English, but each expression have to be in its real context.

    I´m studying English Philology and it doesn´t have anything in common with what They taught me at the High School and the School of Languages.
     

    pozzo

    Senior Member
    inglés canadiense
    I have a doubt realted to:
    She is my friend
    She is a friend of mine

    I'm certain both have the same meanings but what's the difference?
    I think you're right that both have the same meaning although there may be some slight connotative differences. After thinking about it for perhaps too long, I came up with the following.

    If you want to emphasise how you feel about her, you might choose to say "I like her. She's my friend". Saying it that way doesn't imply to me that she is your only friend.

    If someone asks you if you know her, and you want to specify that in fact you know her fairly well, then you could say, "Yes I know her. She's a friend of mine".

    But according to my ear, the two mean the same thing. As far as I see it, the connotative difference is very subtle, and a lot of it may depend on the tone of voice as well.
     
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