a gathering of individuals..., <and> whatever be...

lightheart

Senior Member
Sichuan,China-Chinese
Sample sentences:
1. In its ordinary sense the word “crowd” means a gathering of individuals of whatever nationality, profession, or sex, and whatever be the chances that have brought them together.
2. In its ordinary sense the word “crowd” means a gathering of individuals of whatever nationality, profession, or sex, whatever be the chances that have brought them together.

Questions:
Grammatically, which of the above sentences is correct? And why?

Thanks if you would help : )
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There's no reason for "and," but "whatever be the chances" is very awkward. "No matter what circumstances have brought them together" would be better.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    And (oops, starting a sentence with "and") are you sure that "chances" is the right word? I agree with The Newt, "circumstances" seems more appropriate.
     

    lightheart

    Senior Member
    Sichuan,China-Chinese
    There's no reason for "and," but "whatever be the chances" is very awkward. "No matter what circumstances have brought them together" would be better.
    The first one is from the standard English version of “The Crowd--A Study of the Popular Mind”. Can we simply say that the first sentence doesn’t fit common grammar use?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top