A girl who finally gets married after a long time

bizi

Member
Farsi - Iran
Hello everybody
How would you describe a girl who finally gets married after a long time of being single especially because she has not had any suitors or has not been proposed by a man? I'm not necessarily looking for a single word; in fact, an idiom or expression would be more preferable. In Farsi, we use something like "The spell was finally broken and she got married".
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think, in general, we have moved away from talking about people in this way, the underlying assumption that getting married young is every woman's goal has faded, so I am not sure you'd hear these things said so often any more.

    That said, the old phrase that springs to my mind, is that someone who is not married is "on the shelf" so someone who gets married could be said to have "got off the shelf".

    Or you could say she "finally met Mr Right".
     

    bizi

    Member
    Farsi - Iran
    I think, in general, we have moved away from talking about people in this way, the underlying assumption that getting married young is every woman's goal has faded, so I am not sure you'd hear these things said so often any more.

    That said, the old phrase that springs to my mind, is that someone who is not married is "on the shelf" so someone who gets married could be said to have "got off the shelf".

    Or you could say she "finally met Mr Right".
    Thank you so much suzi br.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    A girl who never married was often called an old maid. Another term was spinster. However, I don't think we had a particular term for a woman who married later (than expected) in life.

    So you could say that she "ended her period of spinsterhood" or "had been afraid she would die an old maid."
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I married for the second time at the age of 67. Without getting into detail about my wife's age, let's just say that she is more or less of my generation. It was her first marriage.

    Of all the suggestions in this thread so far, the only one I consider acceptable is "she finally met Mr. Right." The others would offend her, would offend me, or would offend both of us.
     

    bizi

    Member
    Farsi - Iran
    It seems as though many people can't imagine that some women remain single by choice.
    Unfortunately that's the case. The assumption could be traced back to traditional philosophy that generally puts man above woman, granting the latter no better position than one of passivity: the object of man's love (at best).
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I married for the second time at the age of 67. Without getting into detail about my wife's age, let's just say that she is more or less of my generation. It was her first marriage.

    Of all the suggestions in this thread so far, the only one I consider acceptable is "she finally met Mr. Right." The others would offend her, would offend me, or would offend both of us.
    :thumbsup::)
    Lovely story.

    I think it is important for learners to realise how offensive old-fashioned attitudes which end up embedded in old-fashined phrases can be.

    I didn't really make that clear enough in my first answer, but I certainly would not dream of using most of the suggestions in here! I am glad I found a solution that matched your personal experience.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it is important for learners to realise how offensive old-fashioned attitudes which end up embedded in old-fashioned phrases can be.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

    I think we have to assume that learners will be using English to communicate with native speakers whose socio/cultural values and attitudes might be very different. Education about this aspect of language is far harder than simple lists of taboo words. Of course native speakers also vary in their ideas of what's acceptable! If a fellow Brit used this language, I would challenge him on it. That's assuming it would be a male.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

    I think we have to assume that learners will be using English to communicate with native speakers whose socio/cultural values and attitudes might be very different. Education about this aspect of language is far harder than simple lists of taboo words. Of course native speakers also vary in their ideas of what's acceptable! If a fellow Brit used this language, I would challenge him on it. That's assuming it would be a male.
    It seems as though some women assume only men can't imgagine that some women remain single by choice. That's assuming you're a female, Hermione. :D
     
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