A glorified piece of furniture

ilovejapan

Senior Member
Japanese
I am still watching TED Talk and I have a question about "a glorified piece of furniture".
What does it mean? Is it an idiom?

Background:
"I have cerebral palsy. I shake all the time," Maysoon Zayid announces at the beginning of this exhilarating, hilarious talk. (Really, it's hilarious.) "I'm like Shakira meets Muhammad Ali."

And my first acting gig was as an extra on a daytime soap opera. My dream was coming true.
And I knew I would be promoted from diner diner to wacky best friend in no time.
But instead, I remained a glorified piece of furniture that you could only recognize from the back of my head, and then it became clear to me that casting directors didn’t hire fluffy ethnic, disabled actors.
<<They only hired perfect people, but there were exceptions to the rule.>>

Thanks in advance.
ilovejapan
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    He means he was not required to act, he was no more important in the scene than the furniture. Glorified is an adjective we use to describe something that has been decorated in some way to make it seem better. We sometimes use it ironically. I think this is meant in a slightly ironic way.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it means that instead of getting hired for any of the more challenging roles, she kept getting cast in minor roles in which he was hardly evident.

    In this context, 'furniture' is to be understood as something peripheral to the central action (like scenery), and 'glorified' as seeming more special than is actually the case.

    (Cross-posted and agreeing with suzi)
     

    ilovejapan

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I finally finished wathing this talk and could understand the story very well.
    Thank you all for helping me understand it.:):):)

    ilovejapan
     
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