a glorified secretary

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raffavita

Senior Member
italian
Hi there!
:)
The cop, his deputies and his secretary in the chief's office.
The cop explains to them that a man seems to have killed himself leaving a note. The note states that he has killed another man.
The secretary seems surprised. Here is what she says:
"That doesn't seem right. I know I'm just a glorified secretary around here, but that doesn't seem right."
Che significa "glorified" qui?

All I know is that the police department has just been created. So she must be new of the post.

"Non mi convince. So di di essere solo una segretaria che ha avuto l'onore di essere nominata tale ?"

Grazie in anticipo.
Raffa
:)
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's a way of saying he is just doing menial jobs.

    If a cop spends all his time doing paperwork, and not out on the street arresting criminals, he might say:
    I'm just a glorified secretary around here!!!!!
    I'm just a super-secretary around here!!!!
    I'm just a high-paid secretary around here!!!!
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    "I'm just a glorified secretary"

    This type of expression is often used to talk about a person who has an official job title which is considered a little exaggerated for the actual job. She may be called a Personal Assistant, for example, but she's really only a secretary.

    You can apply it to any job, or even a piece of equipment.

    Eg. A PDA is just a glorified electronic agenda!

    Hope it's clear:)
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    "I'm just a glorified secretary"

    This type of expression is often used to talk about a person who has an official job title which is considered a little exaggerated for the actual job. She may be called a Personal Assistant, for example, but she's really only a secretary.

    I got it! But I have no idea how to translate this.
    Any suggestions?
    "So di essere solo una segretaria who was honoured with this" would work?

    Hope it's clear:)
    For TimLA, it was the secretary herself who said that.
    :)
    Thank you both.
    Raffa
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    This kind of expression is often used in an ironic way, as if to say "the job doesn't merit the exalted title it's been given"

    Eg. My job title is "Office Manager" but I'm really a glorified administrative assistant

    I'm not sure it implies that the person thinks they've been honoured in any way. Do you know what the secretary is officially known as? She could be saying "despite my title, I'm know I'm only a secretary,and as such my opinion doesn't really count, but I think........."

    Others may have different opinions though.:(
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi Murpy, I found this translation for "glorified": nobilitata.

    "Sono solo una segretaria nobilitata."
    She used to be called "a dispatcher" for which term I also opened a thread since we don't have a translation for that and I had to write "segretaria."
    How about that?
    Thank you again.
    Raffa
    :)
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Since the "dispatcher" works on the radio, can't you initially call her "operatore radio" or something, and then use "segretaria" in the "glorified secretary" sentence? That way, you maintain the contrast between job titles in the original.
    :)
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi Murphy, in fact she is a secretary.
    She doesn't simply work with a radio; she even cleans the place when her turn comes. I mean, I have no idea whether we have an equivalent for "dispatcher."

    I found this definition for "dispatcher."

    employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job.

    It sounds like "un'impiegata."
    But since the police department is tiny and there are only the chief, 2 deputies and herself, "impiegata" sounds a bit too formal.

    Anyway, "una segretaria nobilitata" was explained this way in my dictionary: "someone who's nothing more than a glorified secretary."
    Grazie davvero, Murphy.
    :)
     

    beauxyeux

    Senior Member
    italian italy
    I don't like "nobilitata"... why don't you use something like "insigne" left in inverted commas? Or you just put the right word: Sono solo un'umile segretaria...
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    I don't like "nobilitata"... why don't you use something like "insigne" left in inverted commas? Or you just put the right word: Sono solo un'umile segretaria...
    Perché secondo me lei vuole proprio dire che vale meno del titolo he ha. Almeno questo mi è parso di capire dai posts precedenti. Lei non si sente all'altezza della posizione cheha. "To glorify" è sia "resa nobile" che "qulcosa in più di un gradini più basso", non so come dire.

    "Si credeva una diva invece era solo una comparsa nobilitata."
    Neanche a me convince "nobilitata", però, o lo tolgo del tutto come suggerivi tu, oppure boh.
    Non sono sicura che voglia dire "un'umile segretaria", è come se dicesse "sono poco più di una segretaria."
    Che ne dici?
    Grazie beauxyeux. Grazie tutti.
    :)
     

    Grtngs

    Senior Member
    Italia
    Perché secondo me lei vuole proprio dire che vale meno del titolo he ha. Almeno questo mi è parso di capire dai posts precedenti. Lei non si sente all'altezza della posizione cheha. "To glorify" è sia "resa nobile" che "qulcosa in più di un gradini più basso", non so come dire.
    Grazie beauxyeux. Grazie tutti.
    :)
    Solo un'osservazione (non so quanto ti possa essere utile:eek:) ma secondo me non è che lei non si senta all'altezza del ruolo che ha; lei sta dicendo che la sua posizione, anche se viene definita in maniera altisonante altro non è che un semplice lavoro da segretaria.
    Faccio un esempio stupido: l'operatore ecologico altro non è che un "glorified" spazzino.

    Spero di essermi spiegato:)

    G
     

    beauxyeux

    Senior Member
    italian italy
    Può darsi che abbia capito male, ma Tim aveva scritto così:
    It's a way of saying he is just doing menial jobs

    Quindi anche se sono solo un'umile segretaria, forse non avrei diritto a parlare, tuttavia ho la sensazione che ....
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    Solo un'osservazione (non so quanto ti possa essere utile:eek:) ma secondo me non è che lei non si senta all'altezza del ruolo che ha; lei sta dicendo che la sua posizione, anche se viene definita in maniera altisonante altro non è che un semplice lavoro da segretaria.
    Faccio un esempio stupido: l'operatore ecologico altro non è che un "glorified" spazzino.

    Spero di essermi spiegato:)
    Esatto! Per questo, anche se è definita "dispatcher", non è che una segretaria "glorified."
    Però non so come definirla.
    Senz'altro fa lavori umili, ma credo che "glorified" sia il termine di paragone tra "secretary" e "dispatcher." Ecco perché avevo pensato "sono poco più di una segretaria. Fa qualcosa in più ma "dispatcher" è perfino troppo.
    Mamma mia com'è intricata!
    Grazie a tutti, ragazzi.
     

    beauxyeux

    Senior Member
    italian italy
    "Sono poco più di una segretaria" mi sembra perfetto, però allora devi adottare un altro termine per tradurre "dispatcher", che ne dici di "operatrice centralinista"?
     

    perfavore

    Senior Member
    USA
    Philippines - Tagalog
    Ciao Raffa,

    If she used to be a dispatcher, she considers herself lucky/glorified to be appointed/hired as the secretary. Also, saying glorified was her ironic way of introducing her opinion. "I know I am just a secretary here and used to be a dispatcher but that doesn't seem right in my opinion (as a humble secretary)."

    Spero di averti aiutato
     

    Grtngs

    Senior Member
    Italia
    Oppure "I know I'm just a glorified secretary around here" : Lo so che praticamente sono solo una segretaria (anche se la mia qualifica dice "dispatcher")

    Ciao

    G
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    All right, guys.
    In fact, she is a dispatcher.
    I tought I could translate that "glorified" with "poco più di una segretaria."
    Is it wrong?
    Thank you very much.
    :):)
     

    StaceyLee

    Senior Member
    USA/ English
    Hi Raffa,

    I can't think of how to say it in Italian, but here's my idea, for what it's worth. Maybe you can translate it if you like it:

    The secretary seems surprised. Here is what she says:
    "That doesn't seem right. I know I'm just a glorified secretary around here, but that doesn't seem right."

    I know that around here I'm just a secretary with a fancier title, ...
    I know that I'm considered no more than a secretary around here...
     

    raffavita

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi Stacey, hi everybody.
    Thank you for your help. :)
    Here is the result:
    "So di essere poco più di una segretaria, qui."
    That sounds very similar to your second sentence.
    And for dispatcher I opted for "centralinista" as suggested.
    Sounds perfect, now.
    :):)
    Grazie mille.
    Evviva!!!
    :)
     
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