A goes to B

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Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether it is idiomatic to say:

All of his income goes to the gardening.

I am trying to say that all he earns is spent on running the garden。

I've long heard a sentence: The winer goes to ##. I was wondering whether it is a set phrase and different noun can be applied to the phrase. However, I read some threads, someone suggests some better choices "goes toward" and "goes on" while some doesn't say anything wrong with "goes to". I feel confused. Would you give me some advice? Thank you.

See correction in post 5.
 
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  • tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    I was wondering whether it is idiomatic to say:

    All of his income goes to the gardening.
    No. "All of his income goes on/towards (his) gardening". It would have been more helpful to post this as a follow-up question in the other thread.

    Incidentally, it is most unlikely that all of his income goes on any one thing. Most people need to spend some of their income on food, clothes and accommodation.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No. "All of his income goes on/towards (his) gardening". It would have been more helpful to post this as a follow-up question in the other thread.

    Incidentally, it is most unlikely that all of his income goes on any one thing. Most people need to spend some of their income on food, clothes and accommodation.
    Compared with "goes to" used in the sentence "the winner goes to MJ", is the use of "goes on" in "All of his income goes on/towards (his) gardening" not acceptable at all?
     
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    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    You can say goes on gardening. Goes towards means he's saving up for something. I won £50 on the lottery. That can go towards our holiday.
    Have you got a sample sentence with goes to, Sun14? I can't think of a suitable one. What's winer? Is it a misspelling of winner?
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello, my friends,

    I was wondering whether it is idiomatic to say:

    All of his income goes to the gardening.

    I am trying to say that all he earns is spent on running the garden。

    I've long heard a sentence: The winner goes to ##. I was wondering whether it is a set phrase and different noun can be applied to the phrase. However, I read some threads, someone suggests some better choices "goes toward" and "goes on" while some doesn't say anything wrong with "goes to". I feel confused. Would you give me some advice? Thank you.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You can say goes on gardening. Goes towards means he's saving up for something. I won £50 on the lottery. That can go towards our holiday.
    Have you got a sample sentence with goes to, Sun14? I can't think of a suitable one. What's winer? Is it a misspelling of winner?
    I am sorry. It is a typo. When I was watching the award ceremony, The host would say that "the winner goes to ##.
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, Sun.

    Afraid not.
    The host used to say "... and the winner is ...". For some time now that has become "... and the Oscar goes to ...".

    GS :)
     
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