a good / a rich / an ample / an enough supply

wakalumin

Senior Member
Japanese
I'm having difficulty understanding the following multiple-choice question:

Q. Which one cannot be used to fill in the blank?

●There is no one that does not have (a good / a rich / an ample / an enough) supply of God-given qualities.

The answer is "an enough", but could anyone give me an explanation?
Thank you very much in advance.
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hello wakalumin. Your answer, I think, is here as shown in the OALD:

    enough (determiner)
    used before plural or uncountable nouns to mean ‘as many or as much as somebody needs or wants’


    "Supply" is not plural or uncountable in your sentence, so 'enough' can't be used in this particular context. :)
     

    wakalumin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much for your quick response.

    SwissPete, in my dictionary, the word "enough" is classified as pronoun, adverb, and also as adjective...

    Enquiring Mind, I took a look at the page you referred.
    And according to the Cambridge dictionary online, the noun "supply" can be both uncountable and countable, meaning "an amount of something that is available for use"
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/supply_2

    So I still cannot figure it out...

    :confused:
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hello wakalumin, yes, you are right, "supply" can be both countable and uncountable, but in the particular context of your sentence, it is being used as a countable noun ("a rich/good/ample/adequate/sufficient supply"), so the use of "enough" needs to be applied to that same particular context. As "supply" is not plural or uncountable in that particular context, you can't use "enough" in that context.
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    [...]
    SwissPete, in my dictionary, the word "enough" is classified as pronoun, adverb, and also as adjective...
    [...]
    Fair enough!

    The WR dictionary shows it as a determiner or an adverb.

    Enquiring Mind's link shows it as a determiner, a pronoun, or an adverb.

    And here we find that
    ‘Enough’ can qualify an adjective or an adverb or it can go with a noun or even act as a pronoun.
    Confusing enough? :)
     

    wakalumin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I checked the reference you cited above, SwissPete.
    This countable/uncountable issue is sometimes very tough for non-native speakers of English.
    Thank you very much for your help!
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Waka: Enough can certainly be an adjective. But "an enough supply," with the article, makes
    the sentence wrong.

    Drop "an" and I believe the sentence would fly; in my humble opinion.

    << Removed at benneymix's request. >>
     
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