A good writer doesn't only write about an object, but also thinks like that object.

Ajl

Member
Hindi
Here is my original sentence:
A good writer doesn't only write about an object, but also thinks like that object.
But I want to make it more impressive and also cut some words, so I thought of writing it like this:
A good writer doesn't only write about but also thinks like that object.

Is it ok to write it like this? If yes, then in the last, should I say "like that object" or "like an object?"
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You lose all the impact in sentence 2, in my opinion. The repetition of sentence 1 is better for that reason. Get people focused on the object -- show it to them once and then show it to them again.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Normally, a writer can only think like another human being.

    Thus, you lose the sense of the message, as wellas the impact, by referring to another person as an "object."

    (Unless of course, there are some cultural/religious overtones here that I don't understand)

    Therefore, I would say "A good writer has to be able think like the person being written about."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I agree with what others have already said, above, but just sticking with the original structure there's another little point about the shortening of the sentence.
    A good writer doesn't only write about an object, but also thinks like that object.
    If you were going to cut out some words, the place to do it would be in the second reference to the object, not in the first.

    Here is the shortened version from post #1.
    A good writer doesn't only write about but also thinks like that object.
    I get to "... write about ???" and I am lost. My confusion is kind of resolved when I get to "that object", right at the end of the sentence.

    Compare with this alternative.
    A good writer doesn't only write about an object but also thinks like it.

    (I don't know if it showed, but with Copyright's message ringing in my ears I was furiously trying to think like a sentence as I wrote this post.)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    A good writer [loses/immerses/insinuates] himself in the subject matter...

    Terse, pithy, and to the point. (A mantra of one of my writing profs.)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    You could tighten the parallelism of the original a degree with:

    A good writer not only writes about an object, but also thinks like that object.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Is it possible that you mean "subject" rather than "object"?
    I agree that "subject" is a better term.

    My example used "subject matter", but "subject" works for a person, place or thing. Object only works for "things".
     
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