A grave God-fearing man, a quiet sedate nature, the judge was solemn as ...

AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hello,

I have asked a question about the entry sober in WordNet below as the examples together looked like a legitimate sentence at first. However, here I would like to learn if I could put these two sentences below at the front: a grave God-fearing man, a quiet sedate nature; and if so what would they be called in grammar terms, i.e. absolute, appositives, etc?

A grave God-fearing man, a quiet sedate nature, the judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence.

sober ~ adj uncommon
1. not affected by a chemical substance (especially alcohol)
2. dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises
a grave God-fearing man; a quiet sedate nature; as sober as a judge; a solemn promise; the judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence
Source: WordNet 3.0
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    A grave God-fearing man, a quiet sedate nature, the judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence.
    You need either "of" or "with" before "a quiet, sedate nature" and a comma after "quiet".

    Yes, the noun phrase "a grave God-fearing man" and "the judge" are in apposition.

    WR dictionary: in apposition, (of two consecutive nouns in a sentence) referring to the same person or thing. In the sentence "Washington, our first president, was born in Virginia'', the nouns Washington and our first president are in apposition.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    You need either "of" or "with" before "a quiet, sedate nature" and a comma after "quiet".
    Thanks Barque
    I thought it is a possibility only. Oh, maybe the idea I thought about was using metaphors when you'd say "He is a good sedate nature".

    Yes, the noun phrase "a grave God-fearing man" and "the judge" are in apposition.

    WR dictionary: in apposition, (of two consecutive nouns in a sentence) referring to the same person or thing. In the sentence "Washington, our first president, was born in Virginia'', the nouns Washington and our first president are in apposition.
    In the example the appositive phrases come after the noun. Would the opposite without the word first be true? I mean:

    1- Our first president, Washington, was born in Virginia.
    or
    2- Our first president Washington was born in Virginia.

    With dropping first, and adding or removing commas. The reason for dropping first is to make the example closer to the form in question. However, I do not think the first sentence correct punctuation wise.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    In the example the appositive phrases come after the noun.
    The two nouns are the appositive phrases.

    The nouns "president" and "Washington" would still be in apposition if you dropped "first".

    As regards punctuation, I prefer your first option, with commas before and after "Washington".
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Side note:

    "Our first president, Washington, . . . " = our first president, who was named Washington.
    "Our first president Washington, . . . " = of all our presidents called Washington, the first one. (Our first President Roosevelt was Teddy, and our second President Roosevelt was Franklin.)
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Side note:

    "Our first president, Washington, . . . " = our first president, who was named Washington.
    "Our first president Washington, . . . " = of all our presidents called Washington, the first one. (Our first President Roosevelt was Teddy, and our second President Roosevelt was Franklin.)
    Thank you pob14; I must say, it took quite a while to sink in :p

    The first one we have two synonyms so to speak.
    The second one we are describing s specific object from many versions, much like describing a car that has certain features from many cars!

    I could be mistaken, however, but if I recall correctly, the conservative grammar book I've learned a smidgen about appositives states that commas are need to set off a word if the noun could be misinterpreted. Out president without first might be a case in point.
     
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