A great Bay arch across the dirt

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Well, I failed to picture an image for the description "A great Bay arch across the dirt...reaching for sun...". A search for "bay arch" images led me to the pic:



Does it match what the author described? For it indeed "touching the ground on the other side."

Thanks in advance
**********************
It is so quiet here, as though the trees are sucking up so much sound that anything that can get through them has a crystalline quality.

A great Bay arch across the dirt was our last stop on the way. It was in full curvy stretch, arched all the way over our path, reaching for sun, and touching the ground on the other side. I wondered if it would snake along on top of the duff, always following the light.

-Excerpted from “Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace,” published by Riverhead.
 
  • waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I think it's a bay shrub or tree being referred to here, not a bridge.
     
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    bennymix

    Senior Member
    In your picture, the arch is not across dirt, but across water.

    Well, I failed to picture an image for the description "A great Bay arch across the dirt...reaching for sun...". A search for "bay arch" images led me to the pic:



    Does it match what the author described? For it indeed "touching the ground on the other side."

    Thanks in advance
    **********************
    It is so quiet here, as though the trees are sucking up so much sound that anything that can get through them has a crystalline quality.

    A great Bay arch across the dirt was our last stop on the way. It was in full curvy stretch, arched all the way over our path, reaching for sun, and touching the ground on the other side. I wondered if it would snake along on top of the duff, always following the light.

    -Excerpted from “Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace,” published by Riverhead.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Here is an excerpt.

    https://www.amazon.fr/Small-Victories-Spotting-Improbable-Moments/dp/1594486298

    A great bay arch across the dirt was our last stop on the way. It was in full curvy stretch, arched all the way over our path, reaching for sun and touching the ground on the other side. [...] It is nobody’s fool. Lithe and sinewy, the branch looked Asian: I guess we’re all Pacific Rim on this bus. All of its leaves were gone, as if it had spent its time and life force in the arching. Barbara trundled along up to it, smiled, and made the exact arch with her hand—like, Here’s the arch and I’m saluting it, standing beneath it, and now walking through.


    They are in a woods. It's clearly a tree or the branch of one that they are talking about. A long branch can make an arch and droop to the ground at the end of it. And yes, all trees reach for the sun.

    Here is an example: branch making an arch:

    http://m.rgbimg.com/cache1nC1ZZ/users/m/mi/micromoth/600/mgRqfgw.jpg

    http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/b29bad032f084a4abbae6aa7d125c1e0/arching-oak-branch-abyc3a.jpg
     
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    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    It is very clear now.
    But what does "bay" mean in "bay arch"?

    (Two versions of "bay arch": the book in my hand is "bay arch"; the one in the OP is "Bay arch")
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's a bay tree, in my estimation. Anne Lamott is based in San Francisco and it is a very common tree in the larger bay area. They can get to be rather huge, with trunks over a yard in diameter. Not the bay tree of fame in classical Greece and Rome (Laurus nobilis) but the California bay, Umbellularia californica: Umbellularia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, a close cousin. The arch is formed by the branches, no doubt. The trees tend to have a lot of curves and arches.
     
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