A great number of posts intended for older users

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

I remember once I was doing an English test when I came across this sentence:

A great number of posts intended for older users-not younger ones.

I can't find the book but I am sure about this.

Is this passive? What is the active form? Why is to be verb(are) omitted? when can we do this?

Is this the active form? :

The website owner intends a great number of posts for older users.

How common is it to use intend in active form?
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    First of all, it's not a sentence.
    Secondly, it's a shortened version of: A great number of posts that are intended for older users
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    First of all, it's not a sentence.
    Secondly, it's a shortened version of: A great number of posts that are intended for older users
    But that doesn't make sense to me:

    A great number of posts that are intended for older users-not younger ones.


    And why "that are" is omitted and when can we do this?
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    What was the original complete sentence? The one you give is not complete.
    Actually I vividly remember the sentence. It was a test. This was the sentence in the passage:

    Most posts are directed at older people.

    This was in the question section and we had to fill the blank and complete the sentence:

    A great number of..........intended for older users-not younger ones.

    Why didn't they put a full sentence?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The didn't put a full sentence because that was the nature of the question: the sentence contained a blank space that had to be filled in order to complete the sentence.

    In this case, the correct words (yes, words -- you must fill the blank with TWO words, and not one) to put in the blank would be "posts are": a great number of posts are intended for older users. Without the word 'are", you do not have a complete sentence.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    The didn't put a full sentence because that was the nature of the question: the sentence contained a blank space that had to be filled in order to complete the sentence.

    In this case, the correct words (yes, words -- you must fill the blank with TWO words, and not one) to put in the blank would be "posts are": a great number of posts are intended for older users. Without the word 'are", you do not have a complete sentence.
    I specifically remember it said you can put only one word.

    So you think the test was wrong?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can't think of one word that could go in the blank and make a complete sentence.


    As you know, this is by no means the first bad/wrong test question we've seen here. :( And I don't suppose it will be the last.
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    A little extra information: "intended for older users" is an example of a reduced adjective (or relative) clause.

    There are rules and restrictions related to which types of adjective clauses can be reduced, and how they are reduced.

    You can google various rules. In general, the clause needs to have the verb BE (but some other "linking" verbs may work). You can remove the relative pronoun (which/that/etc) and the verb BE (in whichever form); leave the remainder of the clause. If *only one word* (an adjective) is left, you need to move it before the noun. However, most of the time, you have a more complicated predicate (as when there is a past participle and other information), in which case you leave everything in place.

    So:
    The men who were upset went on strike.
    --> The upset men went on strike.
    But:
    The children who were sitting on the sidewalk looked unhappy.
    --> The children sitting on the sidewalk looked unhappy.
    The children who had been accepted by the program looked happy.
    --> The children accepted by the program looked happy.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can find no trace of any such test question online, so I suspect we’ve not been given an accurate version of it.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    My point is that – since you don’t seem know where it’s from – I suspect you’ve remembered it slightly differently from the original. I doubt if you remember it word for word.
     
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